Liveblog auf der Rheinland-Pfalz Radroute im März 2017 | #UmsLand

Wenn sie eine Kartoffel fragen, wie sie dort genannt wird, wo sie aufgewachsen ist, wird sie sie stumm aus winzigen Augen anschielen, harrend auf ihr Schicksal, in einem Dampftopf festkochend zu einem Mahl zubereitet zu werden. Kartoffeln können nicht reden und es ist ihnen egal, wo sie aufgewachsen sind. Der Pfälzer nennt die Kartoffel Grumbeer … „Liveblog auf der Rheinland-Pfalz Radroute im März 2017 | #UmsLand“ weiterlesen

The many faces of Eustace Tilley

MYSTERY MAN
The many faces of Eustace Tilley.
By Louis Menand
It’s hard to know what people who picked up the first issue of The New Yorker, eighty years ago this month, made of the drawing on the cover. The picture is a joke, of course: which is more ephemeral, the dandy or the butterfly? But the picture also seems to be saying something about the magazine itself, and the question is: What? Is the man with the monocle being offered as an image of the New Yorker reader, a cultivated observer of life’s small beauties, or is he being ridiculed as a foppish anachronism? Is it a picture of bemused sophistication or of starchy superciliousness? Did readers identify with the cover, or did they laugh at it?
The message was confusing because the magazine, in those days, was confused. The New Yorker was
launched as a gossipy, facetious weekly for in-the-know Manhattanites, a sort of Jazz Age Spy. The cover was drawn by Rea Irvin, the magazine’s first art editor, who also designed the distinctive New Yorker headline type. His character acquired a name, Eustace Tilley, in a series of humor pieces, by Corey Ford, that ran in the magazine during its first year, and that pretended to provide an inside look at the making of The New Yorker in a style that spoofed corporate promotional writing. Ford’s stories were accompanied by illustrations in which Eustace Tilley turns up, like Waldo, in various scenes—for instance, supervising the felling of “specially grown trees to make paper for The New Yorker.”
Ford’s pieces were commissioned so that there would be something to run on pages that advertisers were not buying. Advertisers were not buying because they were not sure what The New Yorker was. Neither were the editors. The second issue ran a mock apology for the first. “There didn’t seem to be much indication of purpose and we felt sort of naked in our apparent aimlessness,” the magazine confessed. It knew its audience, which was educated, reasonably well-off New Yorkers. It just didn’t know how to reach them. Circulation began to drop; by fall, it stood at around twelve thousand, and the publisher nearly pulled out. Then things picked up. Janet Flanner and Lois Long, a fashion writer, joined the magazine, along with the editor Katharine Angell. Advertising deals were signed with Saks and B. Altman department stores.
In 1926, E. B. White came aboard, and, a year later, he brought James Thurber along. The knowingness and the name-dropping that characterized the early issues disappeared. And Eustace Tilley has shown up on almost every anniversary cover since.
New Yorker readers have become used to him, but it’s not much clearer eighty years later what he’s supposed to represent. Beginning in 1994, efforts were made to do something to his image, which seems, after all, to have little connection to New York City. (Irvin derived it from an 1834 drawing of a Count D’Orsay, “man of Fashion in Early Victorian Period,” that he found reproduced in the costume section of the Encyclopædia Britannica.) After the manner of contemporary art (also of contemporary advertising), the iconography has been parodied, inverted, subverted, and perverted. The man-butterfly binary has been deconstructed, producing a butterfly staring at a man. Species-centrism has been attacked by dressing a dog in the top hat and collar. There has been a female Tilley, an African-American Tilley, and a punk Tilley. On these pages, we introduce some new post-Irvin Tilleys. For two years, in the late nineteen-nineties, there was no anniversary issue, but now the issue is back, and so is Tilley. There is no getting rid of him. He’s the enigma who came to stay.  ♦
Louis Menand has contributed to The New Yorker since 1991, and has been a staff writer since 2001.

The many faces of Eustace Tilley

MYSTERY MAN
The many faces of Eustace Tilley.
By Louis Menand
It’s hard to know what people who picked up the first issue of The New Yorker, eighty years ago this month, made of the drawing on the cover. The picture is a joke, of course: which is more ephemeral, the dandy or the butterfly? But the picture also seems to be saying something about the magazine itself, and the question is: What? Is the man with the monocle being offered as an image of the New Yorker reader, a cultivated observer of life’s small beauties, or is he being ridiculed as a foppish anachronism? Is it a picture of bemused sophistication or of starchy superciliousness? Did readers identify with the cover, or did they laugh at it?
The message was confusing because the magazine, in those days, was confused. The New Yorker was
launched as a gossipy, facetious weekly for in-the-know Manhattanites, a sort of Jazz Age Spy. The cover was drawn by Rea Irvin, the magazine’s first art editor, who also designed the distinctive New Yorker headline type. His character acquired a name, Eustace Tilley, in a series of humor pieces, by Corey Ford, that ran in the magazine during its first year, and that pretended to provide an inside look at the making of The New Yorker in a style that spoofed corporate promotional writing. Ford’s stories were accompanied by illustrations in which Eustace Tilley turns up, like Waldo, in various scenes—for instance, supervising the felling of “specially grown trees to make paper for The New Yorker.”
Ford’s pieces were commissioned so that there would be something to run on pages that advertisers were not buying. Advertisers were not buying because they were not sure what The New Yorker was. Neither were the editors. The second issue ran a mock apology for the first. “There didn’t seem to be much indication of purpose and we felt sort of naked in our apparent aimlessness,” the magazine confessed. It knew its audience, which was educated, reasonably well-off New Yorkers. It just didn’t know how to reach them. Circulation began to drop; by fall, it stood at around twelve thousand, and the publisher nearly pulled out. Then things picked up. Janet Flanner and Lois Long, a fashion writer, joined the magazine, along with the editor Katharine Angell. Advertising deals were signed with Saks and B. Altman department stores.
In 1926, E. B. White came aboard, and, a year later, he brought James Thurber along. The knowingness and the name-dropping that characterized the early issues disappeared. And Eustace Tilley has shown up on almost every anniversary cover since.
New Yorker readers have become used to him, but it’s not much clearer eighty years later what he’s supposed to represent. Beginning in 1994, efforts were made to do something to his image, which seems, after all, to have little connection to New York City. (Irvin derived it from an 1834 drawing of a Count D’Orsay, “man of Fashion in Early Victorian Period,” that he found reproduced in the costume section of the Encyclopædia Britannica.) After the manner of contemporary art (also of contemporary advertising), the iconography has been parodied, inverted, subverted, and perverted. The man-butterfly binary has been deconstructed, producing a butterfly staring at a man. Species-centrism has been attacked by dressing a dog in the top hat and collar. There has been a female Tilley, an African-American Tilley, and a punk Tilley. On these pages, we introduce some new post-Irvin Tilleys. For two years, in the late nineteen-nineties, there was no anniversary issue, but now the issue is back, and so is Tilley. There is no getting rid of him. He’s the enigma who came to stay.  ♦
Louis Menand has contributed to The New Yorker since 1991, and has been a staff writer since 2001.

The many faces of Eustace Tilley

MYSTERY MAN
The many faces of Eustace Tilley.
By Louis Menand
It’s hard to know what people who picked up the first issue of The New Yorker, eighty years ago this month, made of the drawing on the cover. The picture is a joke, of course: which is more ephemeral, the dandy or the butterfly? But the picture also seems to be saying something about the magazine itself, and the question is: What? Is the man with the monocle being offered as an image of the New Yorker reader, a cultivated observer of life’s small beauties, or is he being ridiculed as a foppish anachronism? Is it a picture of bemused sophistication or of starchy superciliousness? Did readers identify with the cover, or did they laugh at it?
The message was confusing because the magazine, in those days, was confused. The New Yorker was
launched as a gossipy, facetious weekly for in-the-know Manhattanites, a sort of Jazz Age Spy. The cover was drawn by Rea Irvin, the magazine’s first art editor, who also designed the distinctive New Yorker headline type. His character acquired a name, Eustace Tilley, in a series of humor pieces, by Corey Ford, that ran in the magazine during its first year, and that pretended to provide an inside look at the making of The New Yorker in a style that spoofed corporate promotional writing. Ford’s stories were accompanied by illustrations in which Eustace Tilley turns up, like Waldo, in various scenes—for instance, supervising the felling of “specially grown trees to make paper for The New Yorker.”
Ford’s pieces were commissioned so that there would be something to run on pages that advertisers were not buying. Advertisers were not buying because they were not sure what The New Yorker was. Neither were the editors. The second issue ran a mock apology for the first. “There didn’t seem to be much indication of purpose and we felt sort of naked in our apparent aimlessness,” the magazine confessed. It knew its audience, which was educated, reasonably well-off New Yorkers. It just didn’t know how to reach them. Circulation began to drop; by fall, it stood at around twelve thousand, and the publisher nearly pulled out. Then things picked up. Janet Flanner and Lois Long, a fashion writer, joined the magazine, along with the editor Katharine Angell. Advertising deals were signed with Saks and B. Altman department stores.
In 1926, E. B. White came aboard, and, a year later, he brought James Thurber along. The knowingness and the name-dropping that characterized the early issues disappeared. And Eustace Tilley has shown up on almost every anniversary cover since.
New Yorker readers have become used to him, but it’s not much clearer eighty years later what he’s supposed to represent. Beginning in 1994, efforts were made to do something to his image, which seems, after all, to have little connection to New York City. (Irvin derived it from an 1834 drawing of a Count D’Orsay, “man of Fashion in Early Victorian Period,” that he found reproduced in the costume section of the Encyclopædia Britannica.) After the manner of contemporary art (also of contemporary advertising), the iconography has been parodied, inverted, subverted, and perverted. The man-butterfly binary has been deconstructed, producing a butterfly staring at a man. Species-centrism has been attacked by dressing a dog in the top hat and collar. There has been a female Tilley, an African-American Tilley, and a punk Tilley. On these pages, we introduce some new post-Irvin Tilleys. For two years, in the late nineteen-nineties, there was no anniversary issue, but now the issue is back, and so is Tilley. There is no getting rid of him. He’s the enigma who came to stay.  ♦
Louis Menand has contributed to The New Yorker since 1991, and has been a staff writer since 2001.

Facts about Kunststraßen 6

In den ersten Jahren des konzeptuellen Kunststraßenbaus führten die Strecken über lange Distanzen auf Fahrradreisen kreuz und quer durch Europa und Deutschland. Norwegen, Schweden, Finnland, Irland und Spanien waren die angepeilten Ziele. In Abständen von zehn Kilometern fotografierte ich die bereiste Strecke, stets den Blick Richtung Reiseziel gerichtet. Die kurzen Strecken kommen. Was in der … „Facts about Kunststraßen 6“ weiterlesen

Summary of the week from 20.02.2017

True Iron Bloggers:

David Opati Aswani (@susumunyu) :
Manfred Gosch (@1aolivenoel) :
Christine Graf (@christinegraf) in Christine Graf – Blog :
Hagen Graf (@hagengraf) :
Osbert Mwijukye (@osbertmwijukye) :
Juergen Rinck (@irgendlink) :
Daniel Roohnikan (@roohnikan) :
Lena Roohnikan (@lerooco) :
Isa Schulz (@murgeys) :

The lazy ones:

Eliminated because of excessive debt:

Cash register:

this week: 15 €
total: 130 €
payed: 0 €
spend: 0 €

Debts:

  • David M.Wampamba (@idesignwebs) – 30€ or 6 good deeds
  • David Opati Aswani (@susumunyu) -25€ or 5 good deeds
  • Jonathan Rukundo (@iam_rukundo) – 25 €  or 5 good deed
  • Adedayo Adeniyi (@daydah) – 25€ or 5 good deeds
  • Osbert Mwijukye (@osbertmwijukye) – 15 € or 3 good deeds
  • Manfred Gosch (@1aolivenoel) – 10 € or 2 good deeds

Previously retired (must pay 30 € for the re-entry):

  • Martin Gosch (since 16.01.2017)
  • Shedy Serem (since 16.01.2017)

E-Mail – Mein persönliches Mysterium

Ich bin fest davon überzeugt, dass E-Mails eine große Rolle im Alltag von Unternehmen spielen und zwar sogar eine viel größere, als ihnen jemals zugedacht war.

Im Prinzip ist, die Idee, die hinter dem Prinzip E-Mail steckt schon im Namen enthalten, es geht um die Versendung digitaler Post, bzw "Briefe", also nicht mehr oder weniger als das versenden von Nachrichten auf digitalem Weg.

Meines Wissens nach werden E-Mails aber in den meisten Unternehmen (leider) zu viel mehr Zwecken "missbraucht", was der Effizienz leider nicht zuträglich ist.

Ein paar Beispiele hierfür wären:

- Bestellungen aus Online-Shop des Unternehmens werden in Form von E-Mails archiviert
- Die Kommunikation zu Projekten findet unternehmens-intern per Email statt
- Zentrale Informationen zu Sachverhalten werden per Email mit und von Mitarbeitern geteilt
- Angebote, Kostenvoranschläge, Bestellungen und Rechnungen werden per E-Mail versendet
- etc.

Im Falle eines Falles werden dann entsprechende Informationen im Nachhinein im immer größer werdenden E-Mail Archiv gesucht. Je Strukturierung der Ablage und Leistungsfähigkeit der Suchfunktion finden sich die Infos dann schnell und umfassend oder auch nicht.

Das größte Rätsel ist und bleibt für mich aber (daher der Titel des Posts): Wenn E-Mail schon das zentral genutzte Medium für die meisten Firmen darstellt, warum gibt es dann bei den meisten E-Mail-Tools keine Groupware Funktionen für Teams?

Das Thema der Shared Mailboxen (bspw. für service@ info@ etc.) wird meiner Meinung nach von den großen Anbietern (Google und Microsoft) völlig vernachlässigt.

Hierbei geht es um Funktionalitäten wie bspw.:

- Gemeinsamer Zugriff auf Postfächer für mehrere Mitarbeiter
- Beantwortung der E-Mails unter gemeinsamem Absender, bspw. service@
- Bearbeitung der E-Mails als definierter Nutzer (Interne Nachvollziehbarkeit, "welcher Kollege hat was geschrieben")
- Möglichkeit, E-Mails Mitarbeitern oder Kollegen zu "assignen"
- E-Mails auf Wiedervorlage legen
- E-Mails mit Kommentaren zu versehen für sich selbst oder andere Kollegen

Um diese ganzen Funktionalitäten hat sich daher ein Drittanbieter Markt entwickelt, mit mehr oder weniger leistungsfähigen Lösungen als PlugIns oder Ergänzungen zu bestehenden E-Mail Systemen. (FrontApp, Missive, etc.)

Alternativ kann man ein Ticketsystem nutzen, was meiner Meinung nach aber ganz direkt vom Thema E-Mail weg geht, und eher Helpdesk Lösungen sind (Zendesk, OTRS, Zammad).

Die große, alles glücklich machende E-Mail Lösung inkl. E-Mail Server, Client (inkl. Webmail) und Groupware, gibt es meines Wissens nach nicht.

Ganz unabhängig von diesen Problemen sollte meiner Meinung nach jedes Unternehmen versuchen, so viele Vorgänge, wie möglich, vom Konzept "E-Mail" zu lösen (ich werde in einem separaten Post auf E-Mail Alternativen näher eingehen).

Einige Beispiele hierfür wären:

- Zentrale Speicherung von Daten und lediglich Mitteilen des Speicherortes per E-Mail (keine Anhänge verschicken)

- Gemeinsames Arbeiten an Dokumenten mit entsprechenden Tools (Office 365, Google Apps, etc.) statt Dateiversionen per E-Mail hin und her schicken

- Chat-Tool für Unternehmen nutzen (Google Hangouts, Slack, etc), am besten mit der Möglichkeit, Channel, oder Chat-Räume zu erstellen.

Ich garantiere aus eigener Erfahrung eine Reduktion des E-Mail Aufkommens um 80% und eine gleichzeitige Steigerung der Effizienz.

To be continued....

E-Mail – Mein persönliches Mysterium

Ich bin fest davon überzeugt, dass E-Mails eine große Rolle im Alltag von Unternehmen spielen und zwar sogar eine viel größere, als ihnen jemals zugedacht war.

Im Prinzip ist, die Idee, die hinter dem Prinzip E-Mail steckt schon im Namen enthalten, es geht um die Versendung digitaler Post, bzw "Briefe", also nicht mehr oder weniger als das versenden von Nachrichten auf digitalem Weg.

Meines Wissens nach werden E-Mails aber in den meisten Unternehmen (leider) zu viel mehr Zwecken "missbraucht", was der Effizienz leider nicht zuträglich ist.

Ein paar Beispiele hierfür wären:

- Bestellungen aus Online-Shop des Unternehmens werden in Form von E-Mails archiviert
- Die Kommunikation zu Projekten findet unternehmens-intern per Email statt
- Zentrale Informationen zu Sachverhalten werden per Email mit und von Mitarbeitern geteilt
- Angebote, Kostenvoranschläge, Bestellungen und Rechnungen werden per E-Mail versendet
- etc.

Im Falle eines Falles werden dann entsprechende Informationen im Nachhinein im immer größer werdenden E-Mail Archiv gesucht. Je Strukturierung der Ablage und Leistungsfähigkeit der Suchfunktion finden sich die Infos dann schnell und umfassend oder auch nicht.

Das größte Rätsel ist und bleibt für mich aber (daher der Titel des Posts): Wenn E-Mail schon das zentral genutzte Medium für die meisten Firmen darstellt, warum gibt es dann bei den meisten E-Mail-Tools keine Groupware Funktionen für Teams?

Das Thema der Shared Mailboxen (bspw. für service@ info@ etc.) wird meiner Meinung nach von den großen Anbietern (Google und Microsoft) völlig vernachlässigt.

Hierbei geht es um Funktionalitäten wie bspw.:

- Gemeinsamer Zugriff auf Postfächer für mehrere Mitarbeiter
- Beantwortung der E-Mails unter gemeinsamem Absender, bspw. service@
- Bearbeitung der E-Mails als definierter Nutzer (Interne Nachvollziehbarkeit, "welcher Kollege hat was geschrieben")
- Möglichkeit, E-Mails Mitarbeitern oder Kollegen zu "assignen"
- E-Mails auf Wiedervorlage legen
- E-Mails mit Kommentaren zu versehen für sich selbst oder andere Kollegen

Um diese ganzen Funktionalitäten hat sich daher ein Drittanbieter Markt entwickelt, mit mehr oder weniger leistungsfähigen Lösungen als PlugIns oder Ergänzungen zu bestehenden E-Mail Systemen. (FrontApp, Missive, etc.)

Alternativ kann man ein Ticketsystem nutzen, was meiner Meinung nach aber ganz direkt vom Thema E-Mail weg geht, und eher Helpdesk Lösungen sind (Zendesk, OTRS, Zammad).

Die große, alles glücklich machende E-Mail Lösung inkl. E-Mail Server, Client (inkl. Webmail) und Groupware, gibt es meines Wissens nach nicht.

Ganz unabhängig von diesen Problemen sollte meiner Meinung nach jedes Unternehmen versuchen, so viele Vorgänge, wie möglich, vom Konzept "E-Mail" zu lösen (ich werde in einem separaten Post auf E-Mail Alternativen näher eingehen).

Einige Beispiele hierfür wären:

- Zentrale Speicherung von Daten und lediglich Mitteilen des Speicherortes per E-Mail (keine Anhänge verschicken)

- Gemeinsames Arbeiten an Dokumenten mit entsprechenden Tools (Office 365, Google Apps, etc.) statt Dateiversionen per E-Mail hin und her schicken

- Chat-Tool für Unternehmen nutzen (Google Hangouts, Slack, etc), am besten mit der Möglichkeit, Channel, oder Chat-Räume zu erstellen.

Ich garantiere aus eigener Erfahrung eine Reduktion des E-Mail Aufkommens um 80% und eine gleichzeitige Steigerung der Effizienz.

To be continued....

Sieraden met houten elementjes!

Het maken van sieraden stamt van heel lang geleden. Ver terug in onze geschiedenis werden er al sieraden gemaakt van allerlei voorwerpen zoals: steentjes, slakkenhuizen, visgraten, dierentanden, schelpen, eierschalen, noten, zadenbot en steen. Ook hout werd veevuldig gebruikt. De oudste vorm van sieraden maken zijn geregen kralen. Die werden eerst van botten, schelpen en steen gemaakt en geregen aan stroken leer, bundels haren of gevlochten
planten.Later werd hier veelal hout voor gebruikt. Tegenwoordig zien we vooral hout, glas en kunststof kralen. Het maken van sieraden wordt beschouwd als de eerste kunstuiting van de mens. De eerste uiting die in feite nutteloos (ten opzichte van jagen, koken, wassen, etc.) was. Sieraden (waaronder houten sieraden) hebben altijd al tot de verbeelding van de mens gesproken en mensen hebben altijd sieraden gedragen. Sieraden zijn voor de mens de uiterlijke en tastbare tekenen van welvaart. De vormen, glinsteringen en kleuren werden wonderlijk gevonden en leken, in de ogen van onze voorouders, het vuur in zich te herbergen. Ze konden moeilijk anders dan goddelijk worden beschouwd. Sieraden hadden in de oudheid, ja zelfs in de pre-historie dus een magische betekenis. Ze werden geacht gelijk, vruchtbaarheid en gezondheid te brengen. Eigenlijk is het tegenwoordig niet veel anders, nog steeds wordt er aan edelmetalen en aan stenen bijzondere krachten toegedicht en bestaan er legendes van geluk of juist rampspoed rondom deze materialen. Ook aan voorwerpen van hout. Niet voor niks is de naam van een van de houtsoorten Het heilige hout (Palo Santo in het Nederlands vervormd tot Palisander.
Een ander aspect van sieraden is dat ze van oudsher dienden als belangrijk communicatiemiddel. De sieraden vertelden namelijk iets over de identiteit van de dragers. Zo waren er verschillende sieraden voor verschillende leden in stammen. 
Archeologen menen dat de drie halskettingen van visgraten die in een graf bij Monaco zijn gevonden, dateren van stammen uit 25 000 voor Christus. In Groot Brittannië heeft men kralen gevonden die dateren uit circa 300 na Christus terwijl er in het National Museum in Kopenhagen ronde en platte kraaltjes liggen van 1400 tot 500 vóór Christus. Deze laatste kralen zijn gemaakt van het zachte speksteen. In Stockholm bevinden zich eveneens enkele druppelvormige kraaltjes uit die periode. Kralen werden in oorsprong van allerlei materiaal gemaakt. 
Neem eens een kijkje naar onze juwelen met hout elementjes via deze LINK!