Bosi Gbangba pt4

Sorry folks, I know this has been long over-due. You can read part 1, part 2 and part 3 first.
=-------=

"What do you think happened?" asked her husband as he joined her on the balcony to watch the coming procession.
"I don't know," she replied, "but it cant be good for 7 people to be carrying our daughter home."
"She's alive isnt she?" the father mused. "Then it can't be that bad. Just calm down."
Thirty minutes later he wasn't sure of his conclusion anymore. The crowd had arrived and were taking up the space in his living room. When he asked what the problem was, they all tried to explain at once.
"Silence!" bellowed Daddy Eko. "Only one person should talk."
"She has a bead stuck in her nose." the sunday school teacher said.
"Is that all?" her mother asked, sighing in releif. "She didn't beat anybody? Didnt steal anything?"
"No Ma." replied the man. "She's a good girl. That's why we're all so concerned."
"I hope there are other teachers with the remaining kids, seeing as many of you as this." Daddy Eko said.
"Yes there are sir." replied the teacher as he realized that only the instructor on the stage didnt follow them to Ajibike's house.
"We will be taking our leave now." he added. "Are you taking her to the hospital?"
"Something stuck in her nose you say?" repeated Daddy Eko as he stroked his thick moustache in thought. "That should be easy to pull out."
"Madam can I get a hairpin?" he asked the mother, who promptly ran into the rooms to get one. She was back seconds later with a black thin piece.
"Thank you." he muttered, as he collected it from her shaking fingers. "Ajibike, come here."
the girl ran to him gaily, smiling.
"Now I want you to do something for me." he said in a softer voice. He waited until her distracted eyes focused on him again before adding, “Stay still. I am going to try to bring out the bead in your nose with this pin. I wont hurt you, but you must stay still so that I can do it properly, ok?”
Little Ajibike nodded in understanding. She looked around again, wondering what the problem was. Her mother looked ready to burst into tears, while her father face held a grim expression. If she didn’t know better she would have thought he wanted to beat her, but she didn’t know what her crime was this time. Surely the bead stuck in her nose was not going to kill her. Couldn’t they all see that she could still smile and talk?
After thirty minutes of gentle rummaging, Daddy Eko raised his eyes to her father and shook his head slightly. Then he asked Ajibike for a favor.
“Breath out like this” And he breathed out.
Ajibike savored the attention she was getting from her Daddy Eko as usual, and obeyed. She breathed in, then she breathed out. Her mother raised her hands to her head and began a silent wail. Her father rubbed her mother’s back and whispered calming noises that Ajibike could barely hear above the din the Sunday school teachers raised at her actions.
Ajibike looked confused. Why did they start shouting? Didn’t they see that she was trying to emulate the deep breath her Daddy Eko just breathed out?
As always, Daddy Eko understood her young mind.
“Don’t try to do it as deep as I did,” he said. “Just breath out with force, you understand?”
She nodded vigorously.
“Now breath out.” He ordered.
She breathed out.
“Harder, Ajibike” he added.
Since there was not enough to breath harder, she breathed in, then out. Her mother started crying seriously.
Daddy Eko pulled Ajibike into a hug then rose from his seat. He and her father thanked the teachers profusely and ushered them to the door. When they were gone, he turned to his friend.
“We have to go to the hospital.” He said. “The bead is round and her nostril is too tiny. They might have to do an operation to get it out though.”
At the word ‘operation’ her mother’s cries grew louder.
“Daddy Eko,” Ajibike said for the first time since she was brought home. “What is wrong with my mummy?”
“She has plenty water in her eyes,” her father replied. “Where is your shoe?”
“It cut.” She replied.
“Go and get another one and lets go.” He ordered.
By the time she had found a complete pair, her mother’s crying had stopped. She came out and handed them to her mother.
“Mummy please help me wear my shoes,” she said. The mother quietly complied.
They entered the hospital through the emergency entrance. When the nurses saw what the emergency was, they began to rush.

=-----------=
THREE HOURS LATER
“Has she woken up yet?” the British doctor interrupted his assistant’s explanation of the procedure they had almost performed on Ajibike.
“She’s stirring sir” the assistant replied, glancing at the girl in her arms, before continuing, “We were supposed to make the incision just above where the bead was stuck, then cut downwards until it could drop freely, but something happened. We could not find the knife to make the incision. This was not possible as I had supervised the cleaning of the tools myself, we were wondering what to do as we had already applied anesthesia and everything, when Dr. Graham interrupted us and asked, “Why not make her sneeze?””
“That was it! By the second sneeze the bead had popped out of her nose, just like that!”
Ajibike’s mother was so relieved that her baby’s nose had not been cut open, she was smiling and praying in Yoruba in short bursts. She prayed for Dr. Graham’s great-grandchildren and Dr. Ogochuckwu’s great great grand children.
Dr. Graham’s attention was more focused on the child that was awakening in Dr. Ogochukwu’s arms. He waited for Ajibike to raise herself and glance around at the people standing over her before he spoke again.
“Little lady,” he said. “If you ever get anything stuck in your nose again, you will meet me in the theatre.”
Then he motioned with his fingers, “I’ll snip snip your nose to get it out.” He didn’t smile as Ajibike shuddered in fear.
To this day, those hairy fingers, making the scissors motion are still vivid in Ajibike’s mind, and she never ever touches her nose with anything, not even a flower.

Bosi Gbangba pt4

Sorry folks, I know this has been long over-due. You can read part 1, part 2 and part 3 first.
=-------=

"What do you think happened?" asked her husband as he joined her on the balcony to watch the coming procession.
"I don't know," she replied, "but it cant be good for 7 people to be carrying our daughter home."
"She's alive isnt she?" the father mused. "Then it can't be that bad. Just calm down."
Thirty minutes later he wasn't sure of his conclusion anymore. The crowd had arrived and were taking up the space in his living room. When he asked what the problem was, they all tried to explain at once.
"Silence!" bellowed Daddy Eko. "Only one person should talk."
"She has a bead stuck in her nose." the sunday school teacher said.
"Is that all?" her mother asked, sighing in releif. "She didn't beat anybody? Didnt steal anything?"
"No Ma." replied the man. "She's a good girl. That's why we're all so concerned."
"I hope there are other teachers with the remaining kids, seeing as many of you as this." Daddy Eko said.
"Yes there are sir." replied the teacher as he realized that only the instructor on the stage didnt follow them to Ajibike's house.
"We will be taking our leave now." he added. "Are you taking her to the hospital?"
"Something stuck in her nose you say?" repeated Daddy Eko as he stroked his thick moustache in thought. "That should be easy to pull out."
"Madam can I get a hairpin?" he asked the mother, who promptly ran into the rooms to get one. She was back seconds later with a black thin piece.
"Thank you." he muttered, as he collected it from her shaking fingers. "Ajibike, come here."
the girl ran to him gaily, smiling.
"Now I want you to do something for me." he said in a softer voice. He waited until her distracted eyes focused on him again before adding, “Stay still. I am going to try to bring out the bead in your nose with this pin. I wont hurt you, but you must stay still so that I can do it properly, ok?”
Little Ajibike nodded in understanding. She looked around again, wondering what the problem was. Her mother looked ready to burst into tears, while her father face held a grim expression. If she didn’t know better she would have thought he wanted to beat her, but she didn’t know what her crime was this time. Surely the bead stuck in her nose was not going to kill her. Couldn’t they all see that she could still smile and talk?
After thirty minutes of gentle rummaging, Daddy Eko raised his eyes to her father and shook his head slightly. Then he asked Ajibike for a favor.
“Breath out like this” And he breathed out.
Ajibike savored the attention she was getting from her Daddy Eko as usual, and obeyed. She breathed in, then she breathed out. Her mother raised her hands to her head and began a silent wail. Her father rubbed her mother’s back and whispered calming noises that Ajibike could barely hear above the din the Sunday school teachers raised at her actions.
Ajibike looked confused. Why did they start shouting? Didn’t they see that she was trying to emulate the deep breath her Daddy Eko just breathed out?
As always, Daddy Eko understood her young mind.
“Don’t try to do it as deep as I did,” he said. “Just breath out with force, you understand?”
She nodded vigorously.
“Now breath out.” He ordered.
She breathed out.
“Harder, Ajibike” he added.
Since there was not enough to breath harder, she breathed in, then out. Her mother started crying seriously.
Daddy Eko pulled Ajibike into a hug then rose from his seat. He and her father thanked the teachers profusely and ushered them to the door. When they were gone, he turned to his friend.
“We have to go to the hospital.” He said. “The bead is round and her nostril is too tiny. They might have to do an operation to get it out though.”
At the word ‘operation’ her mother’s cries grew louder.
“Daddy Eko,” Ajibike said for the first time since she was brought home. “What is wrong with my mummy?”
“She has plenty water in her eyes,” her father replied. “Where is your shoe?”
“It cut.” She replied.
“Go and get another one and lets go.” He ordered.
By the time she had found a complete pair, her mother’s crying had stopped. She came out and handed them to her mother.
“Mummy please help me wear my shoes,” she said. The mother quietly complied.
They entered the hospital through the emergency entrance. When the nurses saw what the emergency was, they began to rush.

=-----------=
THREE HOURS LATER
“Has she woken up yet?” the British doctor interrupted his assistant’s explanation of the procedure they had almost performed on Ajibike.
“She’s stirring sir” the assistant replied, glancing at the girl in her arms, before continuing, “We were supposed to make the incision just above where the bead was stuck, then cut downwards until it could drop freely, but something happened. We could not find the knife to make the incision. This was not possible as I had supervised the cleaning of the tools myself, we were wondering what to do as we had already applied anesthesia and everything, when Dr. Graham interrupted us and asked, “Why not make her sneeze?””
“That was it! By the second sneeze the bead had popped out of her nose, just like that!”
Ajibike’s mother was so relieved that her baby’s nose had not been cut open, she was smiling and praying in Yoruba in short bursts. She prayed for Dr. Graham’s great-grandchildren and Dr. Ogochuckwu’s great great grand children.
Dr. Graham’s attention was more focused on the child that was awakening in Dr. Ogochukwu’s arms. He waited for Ajibike to raise herself and glance around at the people standing over her before he spoke again.
“Little lady,” he said. “If you ever get anything stuck in your nose again, you will meet me in the theatre.”
Then he motioned with his fingers, “I’ll snip snip your nose to get it out.” He didn’t smile as Ajibike shuddered in fear.
To this day, those hairy fingers, making the scissors motion are still vivid in Ajibike’s mind, and she never ever touches her nose with anything, not even a flower.

A Public Apology

Well, I never thought I would do this, but here I am. I had an 'eureka' moment while watching....wait, let me start from the beginning.
In 2006, I looked forward to graduating with the rest of my class, only to find out the hard way that my name was not on the list of graduands - yeah I found out by checking the late brochure, while sitting in the graduating hall, while my family were waiting to start eating (get the full story here).
Anyway, that was ages ago, And I wont rehash the pain and agony I went through trying to rehash the recent past then, trying to find out what I could have done to the department's results coordinator, my course adviser, favourite lecturer and mentor, Mr. Sawyerr. Needless to say his singular action of excluding me from the list caused me a lot of delay in my life's plan, but - I digress.
While I was watching 'Being Erica', it all came together for me. You know, when you sit/stand somewhere, and something flashes in your mind from the past and then you realize you don't feel how you felt right in the middle of the experience. Well, that's how it was for me. I sat there and watched Erica go to the past (as usual) and then the Doc said something that struck a cord within me - 'a setback is a blessing'.
He said that as humans, we always forget what assets 'pain' and 'struggle' are. When we get to the good spots, we always forget how the bad spots helped us to get there. Every setback is always a blessing because it pushes us to move up and higher.
So, in the spirit of 'Being Erica', I'm going to try to patch up my past.
Dear Mr Sawyerr,
  I'm writing to apologise for all the things I wrote and said about you on and off the internet. I was acting through all the pain your actions caused me back then.
 I want you to know that now that I look back, I should have been thanking you instead. So this is to say Thank You.
Thank You for omitting my name on the graduating list. Thank You for excluding my name from the Batch A NYSC list.
You see, that major setback re-arranged my life. Now that I look back, God had everything planned out. All that I viewed as setbacks along the way were actually God-orchestrated stop-gaps to fill in the spaces in His plan for my life.
Thank You most especially for letting God use you. I am most grateful.
Regards,
Daydah

A Public Apology

Well, I never thought I would do this, but here I am. I had an 'eureka' moment while watching....wait, let me start from the beginning.
In 2006, I looked forward to graduating with the rest of my class, only to find out the hard way that my name was not on the list of graduands - yeah I found out by checking the late brochure, while sitting in the graduating hall, while my family were waiting to start eating (get the full story here).
Anyway, that was ages ago, And I wont rehash the pain and agony I went through trying to rehash the recent past then, trying to find out what I could have done to the department's results coordinator, my course adviser, favourite lecturer and mentor, Mr. Sawyerr. Needless to say his singular action of excluding me from the list caused me a lot of delay in my life's plan, but - I digress.
While I was watching 'Being Erica', it all came together for me. You know, when you sit/stand somewhere, and something flashes in your mind from the past and then you realize you don't feel how you felt right in the middle of the experience. Well, that's how it was for me. I sat there and watched Erica go to the past (as usual) and then the Doc said something that struck a cord within me - 'a setback is a blessing'.
He said that as humans, we always forget what assets 'pain' and 'struggle' are. When we get to the good spots, we always forget how the bad spots helped us to get there. Every setback is always a blessing because it pushes us to move up and higher.
So, in the spirit of 'Being Erica', I'm going to try to patch up my past.
Dear Mr Sawyerr,
  I'm writing to apologise for all the things I wrote and said about you on and off the internet. I was acting through all the pain your actions caused me back then.
 I want you to know that now that I look back, I should have been thanking you instead. So this is to say Thank You.
Thank You for omitting my name on the graduating list. Thank You for excluding my name from the Batch A NYSC list.
You see, that major setback re-arranged my life. Now that I look back, God had everything planned out. All that I viewed as setbacks along the way were actually God-orchestrated stop-gaps to fill in the spaces in His plan for my life.
Thank You most especially for letting God use you. I am most grateful.
Regards,
Daydah

10 Tips on How to Work from Home in Nigeria

This is my first post this year and to my readers I apologize. I apologize because it took a threat from one of you to come here.
Its been hectic - Getting adjusted to 'After-The-Wedding' life and new working environment and all that. Although someone will say that working from home isn't a new environment but believe me, it is.
I spent Primary 5 and 6 and all of my Secondary school education as a Boarding student. My Mum usually had to resort to threats to get me to come home when I was in the University, so for me it is a new environment.

The daily routine is ...different because I spend more time working unconsciously. Normal working hours are 8 to 5, but I find myself working longer because I never really leave work. I didnt really see it in this light until my mother came visiting.
"What is your husband having for breakfast?" she would ask, to which I would just point to the fridge.
"What will your husband eat when he returns?" my Mum would ask, to which I would just nod my head. After he left, she gave me THE talk.

I know Nigeria is going to start adopting the work-from-home methods of conducting business so I have a few pointers for the employees that might start jumping up and down if they ever find themselves in such a position [and also for those that envy the home-workers]:

1. Work Area: You need to set a particular area for work and work alone. I learnt this the hard way - first I worked on the dining table, because I felt the study was too 'serious' for me. Then I progressed to the living room carpet with a cushioning pillow under my chest. Then I ended up in the bedroom, but I was still not so comfy until I found myself in the Study. That was the best place for me to work because it was made for work. You need an environment that sets you up in 'Work Mode', that will not let you stray and that you can consciously leave after work hours.

2. Ground Rules: You need to lay some ground rules, and I am not talking about rules for the children. You need those rules for yourself - YES YOU! You need to decide what you will be attending to when you re within work hours and what you can term an emergency. For me I thank God my husband loves Cereal for Breakfast, so its easy to set up his meal before I resume online. After he leaves for work, the only emergency that can get me up from my desk is if the gate is burning. I keep my breakfast within reach so when I get hungry I wont have to stray far. I don't have kids yet, but I am sure most parents can sort out how to keep the kids away.

3. Distraction: This leads to distractions - try to keep them at a bare minimum. For me I keep the TV off, and the Radio, I'm so quiet that my neighbors usually don't even know when I'm in the house. I also stay away from the kitchen and snacks - working from home is one of the fastest ways to gain weight because you are almost always sitting down, and its worse when you keeps snacks around you and just eat and eat and eat. You have to fight the urge to eat junk even more if you work from home.

4. Exercise: Because you sit all through and hardly leave the house, your body will retain everything it takes in because there is no activity to use to burn it out. You have to find a way to stay active. After closing, I go for 30 minute walks that are sometimes brisk, sometimes slow. It gives me time to also think and plan, especially when there is a hard nut to crack on my work-table. You can also do some exercise while working - stand up for a few minutes and len over the table. Walk around the room. Stretch. Go to the front door and return. It will keep your blood flowing.

5. Electricity and Internet: To work efficiently you have to make sure that these two are available to you all the time. The Office wont want to hear excuses like 'NEPA took the light', or 'My Internet finished'. No, they just want you to deliver, and they already feel they are pampering you by letting you work from home anyway so, you have to go out of yourway to ensure that the two are available. For me I have Starcomms internet, and use MTN as backup. I have an inverter that can last up to 5 hours and we just bought a generator recently [#lightupnigeria already!].

6. Follow-up: Whatever you're working on, you have to keep up the communication. Whether its through Yahoo Messenger, or Skype, you must be visible to the office people. What I did was to create a group for office members and every morning I log on and become visible to them during work hours. It is essential that they know that you are working as well. Even when I am mobile, I try to stay online via mobile messenger.

7. Breaktime: Do not joke with your lunch/break time. You need that one hour to do other pressing things like washing the dinner plates from last night, finishing up laying the bed that you started before you resumed work, or grabbing that bite of food. At the same time do not extend the time. Let your system get used to only one hour of freedom before getting back to work.

8. Food: Watch what you eat for lunch. I am talking as a proper Nigerian babe now - don't go and be eating Garri and leftover afang soup, or pounded yam and oha soup o! You will just sleep off for the rest of the day - and that is the truth! Eat light - pretend you are at work physically, would you have packed that pounded yam to work? Would you have eaten it right in the canteen? Seriously? I prefer rice [and beans sometimes] for lunch, and I can even call it breakfast because I do not normally eat before noon. Anything that will take more than one hour to cook AND eat is off your list.

9. Call Base: Even though they can see your mails and messages online at work, it is necessary for you to call the office, at least once  week. This is essential for out of town home-workers like me, who cannot pop into the office anytime. This will keep the memory of you fresh in their minds [especially the accountant who handles the salary].

10. Family : Last of all but not the least, please do NOT neglect your family o! Close on time! Now you have the grace to close on the dot of 5pm! Do not extend work any longer than necessary. Give your family the quality time they deserve.
So its been six months and I finally can balance it all well - I should think so!

10 Tips on How to Work from Home in Nigeria

This is my first post this year and to my readers I apologize. I apologize because it took a threat from one of you to come here.
Its been hectic - Getting adjusted to 'After-The-Wedding' life and new working environment and all that. Although someone will say that working from home isn't a new environment but believe me, it is.
I spent Primary 5 and 6 and all of my Secondary school education as a Boarding student. My Mum usually had to resort to threats to get me to come home when I was in the University, so for me it is a new environment.

The daily routine is ...different because I spend more time working unconsciously. Normal working hours are 8 to 5, but I find myself working longer because I never really leave work. I didnt really see it in this light until my mother came visiting.
"What is your husband having for breakfast?" she would ask, to which I would just point to the fridge.
"What will your husband eat when he returns?" my Mum would ask, to which I would just nod my head. After he left, she gave me THE talk.

I know Nigeria is going to start adopting the work-from-home methods of conducting business so I have a few pointers for the employees that might start jumping up and down if they ever find themselves in such a position [and also for those that envy the home-workers]:

1. Work Area: You need to set a particular area for work and work alone. I learnt this the hard way - first I worked on the dining table, because I felt the study was too 'serious' for me. Then I progressed to the living room carpet with a cushioning pillow under my chest. Then I ended up in the bedroom, but I was still not so comfy until I found myself in the Study. That was the best place for me to work because it was made for work. You need an environment that sets you up in 'Work Mode', that will not let you stray and that you can consciously leave after work hours.

2. Ground Rules: You need to lay some ground rules, and I am not talking about rules for the children. You need those rules for yourself - YES YOU! You need to decide what you will be attending to when you re within work hours and what you can term an emergency. For me I thank God my husband loves Cereal for Breakfast, so its easy to set up his meal before I resume online. After he leaves for work, the only emergency that can get me up from my desk is if the gate is burning. I keep my breakfast within reach so when I get hungry I wont have to stray far. I don't have kids yet, but I am sure most parents can sort out how to keep the kids away.

3. Distraction: This leads to distractions - try to keep them at a bare minimum. For me I keep the TV off, and the Radio, I'm so quiet that my neighbors usually don't even know when I'm in the house. I also stay away from the kitchen and snacks - working from home is one of the fastest ways to gain weight because you are almost always sitting down, and its worse when you keeps snacks around you and just eat and eat and eat. You have to fight the urge to eat junk even more if you work from home.

4. Exercise: Because you sit all through and hardly leave the house, your body will retain everything it takes in because there is no activity to use to burn it out. You have to find a way to stay active. After closing, I go for 30 minute walks that are sometimes brisk, sometimes slow. It gives me time to also think and plan, especially when there is a hard nut to crack on my work-table. You can also do some exercise while working - stand up for a few minutes and len over the table. Walk around the room. Stretch. Go to the front door and return. It will keep your blood flowing.

5. Electricity and Internet: To work efficiently you have to make sure that these two are available to you all the time. The Office wont want to hear excuses like 'NEPA took the light', or 'My Internet finished'. No, they just want you to deliver, and they already feel they are pampering you by letting you work from home anyway so, you have to go out of yourway to ensure that the two are available. For me I have Starcomms internet, and use MTN as backup. I have an inverter that can last up to 5 hours and we just bought a generator recently [#lightupnigeria already!].

6. Follow-up: Whatever you're working on, you have to keep up the communication. Whether its through Yahoo Messenger, or Skype, you must be visible to the office people. What I did was to create a group for office members and every morning I log on and become visible to them during work hours. It is essential that they know that you are working as well. Even when I am mobile, I try to stay online via mobile messenger.

7. Breaktime: Do not joke with your lunch/break time. You need that one hour to do other pressing things like washing the dinner plates from last night, finishing up laying the bed that you started before you resumed work, or grabbing that bite of food. At the same time do not extend the time. Let your system get used to only one hour of freedom before getting back to work.

8. Food: Watch what you eat for lunch. I am talking as a proper Nigerian babe now - don't go and be eating Garri and leftover afang soup, or pounded yam and oha soup o! You will just sleep off for the rest of the day - and that is the truth! Eat light - pretend you are at work physically, would you have packed that pounded yam to work? Would you have eaten it right in the canteen? Seriously? I prefer rice [and beans sometimes] for lunch, and I can even call it breakfast because I do not normally eat before noon. Anything that will take more than one hour to cook AND eat is off your list.

9. Call Base: Even though they can see your mails and messages online at work, it is necessary for you to call the office, at least once  week. This is essential for out of town home-workers like me, who cannot pop into the office anytime. This will keep the memory of you fresh in their minds [especially the accountant who handles the salary].

10. Family : Last of all but not the least, please do NOT neglect your family o! Close on time! Now you have the grace to close on the dot of 5pm! Do not extend work any longer than necessary. Give your family the quality time they deserve.
So its been six months and I finally can balance it all well - I should think so!