Perfect Blue

I was searching for a long time for the perfect blue, played around with different pigments, lost my track a bit through the dead of my mother and finally felt that I need another colour in this painting. My perfect blue has got a dash of green, a green I created by adding some terre […]

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Silver Grey

It is often said that grey is not a colour, but a statement, if you want to hide or remain invisible (the grey mouse). Sometimes, instead of positioning oneself for one side or another, we are looking for a way in the middle between two opposites, between white and black. But grey can also be […]

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Exploratory Painting

I am always experimenting with different natural materials, such as lime, marble powder, fine sand, ash, to create depth and structure. The challenge lies in bonding these materials and adhere them to a flexible canvas. Sometimes, they just crumble away after drying. Using a mix of pure lime with marble powder, which is used for […]

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Yellow

In the middle of the winter, when it became really cold, grey and windy, when the sun did not shine for a few days, I was longing for the blue sky and bright light. I thought of using yellow, the colour of the sun, to create a painting which could brighten up this time of […]

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The Signature of my Art

Signing my paintings is always the last part of my work, when signed, the painting is ready. To me, it’s the sign of completion, like an approval of the result of a creative process. I have talked to artists and did a little research, and I also always paid attention to the signatures in galleries […]

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Turquoise

Turquoise - detail
Turquoise – detail

Blue again, in all its shades, as the light let it seem and the wind stirs it up.
In this painting, deep blue and green, with dashes of turquoise.

If you have ever seen the different seas of this world, you know what I mean 😉
Turquoise, a transition from blue to green, is perceived either as crystal clear or as icy cold.
In any case, this color dissociates, it stands for independence, self-reliance and idealism. Just like the sea, it has burbled for millions of years, even though we human beings are increasingly harming it with our so-called civilisation.
here where I live, I see the sea almost every day.
sea_03 Now, the main holiday season is over again, the sea starts to recover. It almost always begins with a strong wind or storm, which seems to sweep away everything that does not belong to the sea and to the beach, as if the sea is angry at what it had to endure.
When the wind calmed down, everything looks very flashy and almost virgin (except for the garbage that has been flushed to the beach after such a storm).sea_01And then the sea appears to me so powerful, independent and self-reliant, as it is attributed to the color turquoise.

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Who inspired me: Mark Rothko

Until a few years ago, I could not imagine that I can create art.
It changed when I took a course in 2009, to learn using traditional techniques to restore and decorate walls.
My trainer was an artist-artisan, he not only miraculously mixed colours and materials, and explained how the different materials react with each other, he also conjured beautiful examples of multi-coloured stucco, lime plaster and Tadelakt.
I was thrilled, but still far away from thinking that this might have something to do with art.
For me, it was perfect craftsmanship, but it bordered on art 😉
During this course, I discovered that I have a knack for colours and I am quite good in applying the various techniques. So I started practicing to refine my skills. Over the years I have plastered many hundreds of square meters of walls. And still I did not think that this is a kind of art.
Friends who come to visit us every year began early to tell me that I should go a bit further and also use other supports than just walls because it is art, what I was doing.
I am indeed happy they liked the results of my work, but for me, the thought of trying that on canvas, was far away.
In January this year, we visited the Pop Art exhibition at the Tate Modern in London, and because this is such a wonderful museum, we went there again the next day and had a look at the permanent exhibition. I wanted to see the paintings of Gerhard Richter, who impressed me quite a bit a few years ago at the Museum of Fine Art in Leipzig, but this is another story to tell.
The Richter paintings are wonderful, but the biggest surprise for me that day was a room in which the Seegram Murals by Mark Rothko hang.

Mark Rothko Red on Maroon
Mark Rothko Red on Maroon

I had never heard of this artist and was deeply fascinated. What was hanging there, were paintings for decorating the walls of the Four Seasons restaurants in New York. These paintings reminded me very much of how I decorate walls. I spent about one hour in this dark room, I went back and forth, repeatedly looked at all pictures and was deeply touched. This subtle effect of how colours can influence a room (and moods) was overwhelming.
Now I understood what our friends thought when they looked at my walls and rooms. I decided to transfer techniques for the design of walls on canvas and adapt them to this flexible material.
At a first glance, it might look easy to paint with only one color, but it is quite complicated to bring in texture and depth and trigger emotions.

My two paintings Red and Blue are my first examples of just applying different hues of one colour.
Currently I’m experimenting with the color white, but it still takes a little until I like to show the result to the public.

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Who inspired me: Mark Rothko

Until a few years ago, I could not imagine that I can create art.
It changed when I took a course in 2009, to learn using traditional techniques to restore and decorate walls.
My trainer was an artist-artisan, he not only miraculously mixed colours and materials, and explained how the different materials react with each other, he also conjured beautiful examples of multi-coloured stucco, lime plaster and Tadelakt.
I was thrilled, but still far away from thinking that this might have something to do with art.
For me, it was perfect craftsmanship, but it bordered on art 😉
During this course, I discovered that I have a knack for colours and I am quite good in applying the various techniques. So I started practicing to refine my skills. Over the years I have plastered many hundreds of square meters of walls. And still I did not think that this is a kind of art.
Friends who come to visit us every year began early to tell me that I should go a bit further and also use other supports than just walls because it is art, what I was doing.
I am indeed happy they liked the results of my work, but for me, the thought of trying that on canvas, was far away.
In January this year, we visited the Pop Art exhibition at the Tate Modern in London, and because this is such a wonderful museum, we went there again the next day and had a look at the permanent exhibition. I wanted to see the paintings of Gerhard Richter, who impressed me quite a bit a few years ago at the Museum of Fine Art in Leipzig, but this is another story to tell.
The Richter paintings are wonderful, but the biggest surprise for me that day was a room in which the Seegram Murals by Mark Rothko hang.

Mark Rothko Red on Maroon
Mark Rothko Red on Maroon

I had never heard of this artist and was deeply fascinated. What was hanging there, were paintings for decorating the walls of the Four Seasons restaurants in New York. These paintings reminded me very much of how I decorate walls. I spent about one hour in this dark room, I went back and forth, repeatedly looked at all pictures and was deeply touched. This subtle effect of how colours can influence a room (and moods) was overwhelming.
Now I understood what our friends thought when they looked at my walls and rooms. I decided to transfer techniques for the design of walls on canvas and adapt them to this flexible material.
At a first glance, it might look easy to paint with only one color, but it is quite complicated to bring in texture and depth and trigger emotions.

My two paintings Red and Blue are my first examples of just applying different hues of one colour.
Currently I’m experimenting with the color white, but it still takes a little until I like to show the result to the public.

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A New Masterpiece: Silver

Gold and silver are often mentioned in the same breath, somehow belonging together, they represent about the same symbols and attributes. Admittedly, I have a slightly different feeling about silver, to me it is more clean and has more clarity, typifies modernity and technology.
Anyway, after painting Gold, it was obvious to paint the other half of that couple.

As always, I applied many layers of paint in varying thickness, by using spatulas, brushes and self-made fabric stamps.
I then sanded or abraded them and anew these layers. Instead of genuine silver, I used silver paint since it does not oxidize.
Here a series of photos documenting the painting process a bit:

Silver - steps
Silver – steps

The result is as always a little surprising also for myself, because the structures arise on the go, at random.

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Should the room fit to the art or the art fit to the room?

As an artist, I prefer that everyone buy the art they love, and thus they will find a place for it in their home. Selecting and placing art is an art in itself.
It might be difficult to find the right place in your home, fitting to your style. In such a case it could be helpful to hang it in different places, maybe re-arrange some furniture, re-paint a wall, improve lightning, all these changes will be worth in order to enjoy the art you love.
Abstract art could also be helpful to create a colour palette for your room by repeating one or two main colours of the painting in your home accessories. The same applies for lines and forms in abstract paintings.

Gold

I hung my painting Gold in different rooms, with different coloured walls. Just have a look and decide yourself the setting you would prefer.

In a bathroom

bath01

bathroom above bathtub

In a kitchen

kitchen02

In a living room

sejour02

Many people believe abstract art is just suitable for modern homes, but it can also complement nicely a more traditional setting. It can really refresh your home and modernize it a bit. Abstract art bridges between traditional and modern styles as you can easily pair up antique furniture with modern design pieces.

So if you do it the other way round, doing your home/room first, you might chose art which just complements your decoration. Quite often, the colors in an abstract painting can partially be found in the rest of the room by reuniting all the the colors around.  Sometimes, an abstract painting is the focal point in a room. However, rooms overcrowded with textures, materials and colours make you feel overwhelmed and take the focus away from your art.

The pictures above were taken in an old village house which is sparsely furnished with antique and modern pieces. Modern art fits very well into it 😉

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