Bosi Gbangba pt5

Sorry folks, I know this has been long over-due. You can read part 1, part 2, part 3 and part 4 first.
=-------=
=-------=
"Mummy, open the door!" Ajibike shouted as she jumped up and down excitedly at the entrance to her home. She had just come back from a photo session with her best friend, Lanre. They were neighbors- the Adekomi's stayed on the ground floor while their family occupied the upper flat of their building, which was among the staff quarters on campus.
Ajibike had been scared at first when her mother had told her Mr. Adekomi would be taking them there, a man so tall that all she ever saw were his long long legs. The only time she ever saw his face was the one time he had carried them all to school, when he yelled that she had not closed the door of his VolksWagen Beetle car properly, and after that, she had cried that she never wanted to follow him to school again. It didn't help that his cheeks were lined from one end to another in tribal marks either.

Ajibike had sat quietly in the car until they had gotten to the studio, and had scrambled out so she would not be the last one out of the car - and thus the one to close the door. She had had a fun time making faces at the camera, only to be told that she had been there before as a baby, with her friend Lanre. She had been given a complimentary copy of their early photo and she was clutching it in her hand at the door right then.


Before she could shout again, the door swung open, and she ran into the living room. Her Aunt Itam, her mother's Calabar-born help was busy trying to force her little brother to wear a sweater over his shirt - with one glance Ajibike saw she wasn't making any progress.
"Where is mummy?" she asked.
"Is that how to say good afternoon?" Aunt Itam replied.
"Sorry Auntie," Ajibike mumbled. "good afternoon Auntie."
"Good afternoon to you too," Aunt Itam replied. "How was your photography?"
"You mean photo session, Itam," Aunt Ibiriyike interrupted as she entered the room. She was Ajibike's mother's younger sister, and as far as Ajibike was concerned, an angel from God living among humans.
"Yes," Aunt Itam agreed."Your photo session, how was it?"
"Fine Auntie," shouted Ajibike, who pivoted to her angel instantly. "I behaved myself, and the photographer gave me this as a gift! He said I had been there before as a baby!"
"Yes that's true," agreed Aunt Ibiriyike. "When you had no hair on your shiny head."
Ajibike touched her head of full, curly hair. "I didn't have hair?" she asked, dismayed.
"Yes, but you have plenty now," Aunt Ibiriyike said, rubbing her head affectionately before she pulled out the large-scale photo gift, and smiled. It was a copy of the shot showing Ajibike sitting on a stool, and Lanre standing beside her, both smiling so happily.
"Lemme see!" shouted Ajibike, as she jumped up, trying to catch a glimpse.
"Here have it," Aunt Ibiriyike handed it over to her.
Ajibike stared at the picture and smiled, already sure she was going to tease Lanre for his almost toothless grin at his age - he was about a year older than her and should have had plenty teeth by the time of the picture. She felt a tug at her shirt and looked down at her baby brother Deji as he used her as a prop to stand. When he was upright he reached for the photograph but she raised it out of his reach.
"No Deji," she said repeatedly. "You will spoil it!"
Frustrated, the toddler grabbed her clothes closer as if to hug her.
Ajibike smiled. Her baby brother had never tried hugging her before, she thought, as she put her hands around his body, bending a little to enjoy the special moment.

Then she felt the bite.
Her baby brother had bitten her stomach, in the navel area, with all of his five teeth.
It would have been mild if the boy had let go but he held on to her flesh, through her dress, as tight as he could.

Ajibike's yells brought everybody, including her father, to the living room. Eventually they were able to separate the two children. While Deji gave his first true smile since he could crawl, Ajibike cried and cried so much that her mother was scared that they might have to go to the hospital just for check up. As their father was still contemplating whether to disagree, Mrs. Adekomi, who was a nurse, knocked on the door.
"We heard Ajibike screaming," she said. "Hope no problem."
"None o," replied Ajibike's mother. "Just the two of them fighting. Deji bit Ajibike in the stomach."
"Thanks for checking on us Madam." Ajibike's Dad interrupted Mrs. Adekomi's sympathetic response. "And if you dont mind, could you please examine the bite? She keeps crying and crying."
Fifteen minutes later Mrs. Adekomi confirmed his thoughts - no serious wounds. She must be crying from the emotional pain,the nurse concluded.
But when by nighttime Ajibike was still sobbing and scrambling away from Deji everytime he crawled near, her mother knew she had to do something.

Bosi Gbangba pt5

Sorry folks, I know this has been long over-due. You can read part 1, part 2, part 3 and part 4 first.
=-------=
=-------=
"Mummy, open the door!" Ajibike shouted as she jumped up and down excitedly at the entrance to her home. She had just come back from a photo session with her best friend, Lanre. They were neighbors- the Adekomi's stayed on the ground floor while their family occupied the upper flat of their building, which was among the staff quarters on campus.
Ajibike had been scared at first when her mother had told her Mr. Adekomi would be taking them there, a man so tall that all she ever saw were his long long legs. The only time she ever saw his face was the one time he had carried them all to school, when he yelled that she had not closed the door of his VolksWagen Beetle car properly, and after that, she had cried that she never wanted to follow him to school again. It didn't help that his cheeks were lined from one end to another in tribal marks either.

Ajibike had sat quietly in the car until they had gotten to the studio, and had scrambled out so she would not be the last one out of the car - and thus the one to close the door. She had had a fun time making faces at the camera, only to be told that she had been there before as a baby, with her friend Lanre. She had been given a complimentary copy of their early photo and she was clutching it in her hand at the door right then.


Before she could shout again, the door swung open, and she ran into the living room. Her Aunt Itam, her mother's Calabar-born help was busy trying to force her little brother to wear a sweater over his shirt - with one glance Ajibike saw she wasn't making any progress.
"Where is mummy?" she asked.
"Is that how to say good afternoon?" Aunt Itam replied.
"Sorry Auntie," Ajibike mumbled. "good afternoon Auntie."
"Good afternoon to you too," Aunt Itam replied. "How was your photography?"
"You mean photo session, Itam," Aunt Ibiriyike interrupted as she entered the room. She was Ajibike's mother's younger sister, and as far as Ajibike was concerned, an angel from God living among humans.
"Yes," Aunt Itam agreed."Your photo session, how was it?"
"Fine Auntie," shouted Ajibike, who pivoted to her angel instantly. "I behaved myself, and the photographer gave me this as a gift! He said I had been there before as a baby!"
"Yes that's true," agreed Aunt Ibiriyike. "When you had no hair on your shiny head."
Ajibike touched her head of full, curly hair. "I didn't have hair?" she asked, dismayed.
"Yes, but you have plenty now," Aunt Ibiriyike said, rubbing her head affectionately before she pulled out the large-scale photo gift, and smiled. It was a copy of the shot showing Ajibike sitting on a stool, and Lanre standing beside her, both smiling so happily.
"Lemme see!" shouted Ajibike, as she jumped up, trying to catch a glimpse.
"Here have it," Aunt Ibiriyike handed it over to her.
Ajibike stared at the picture and smiled, already sure she was going to tease Lanre for his almost toothless grin at his age - he was about a year older than her and should have had plenty teeth by the time of the picture. She felt a tug at her shirt and looked down at her baby brother Deji as he used her as a prop to stand. When he was upright he reached for the photograph but she raised it out of his reach.
"No Deji," she said repeatedly. "You will spoil it!"
Frustrated, the toddler grabbed her clothes closer as if to hug her.
Ajibike smiled. Her baby brother had never tried hugging her before, she thought, as she put her hands around his body, bending a little to enjoy the special moment.

Then she felt the bite.
Her baby brother had bitten her stomach, in the navel area, with all of his five teeth.
It would have been mild if the boy had let go but he held on to her flesh, through her dress, as tight as he could.

Ajibike's yells brought everybody, including her father, to the living room. Eventually they were able to separate the two children. While Deji gave his first true smile since he could crawl, Ajibike cried and cried so much that her mother was scared that they might have to go to the hospital just for check up. As their father was still contemplating whether to disagree, Mrs. Adekomi, who was a nurse, knocked on the door.
"We heard Ajibike screaming," she said. "Hope no problem."
"None o," replied Ajibike's mother. "Just the two of them fighting. Deji bit Ajibike in the stomach."
"Thanks for checking on us Madam." Ajibike's Dad interrupted Mrs. Adekomi's sympathetic response. "And if you dont mind, could you please examine the bite? She keeps crying and crying."
Fifteen minutes later Mrs. Adekomi confirmed his thoughts - no serious wounds. She must be crying from the emotional pain,the nurse concluded.
But when by nighttime Ajibike was still sobbing and scrambling away from Deji everytime he crawled near, her mother knew she had to do something.

Bosi Gbangba pt4

Sorry folks, I know this has been long over-due. You can read part 1, part 2 and part 3 first.
=-------=

"What do you think happened?" asked her husband as he joined her on the balcony to watch the coming procession.
"I don't know," she replied, "but it cant be good for 7 people to be carrying our daughter home."
"She's alive isnt she?" the father mused. "Then it can't be that bad. Just calm down."
Thirty minutes later he wasn't sure of his conclusion anymore. The crowd had arrived and were taking up the space in his living room. When he asked what the problem was, they all tried to explain at once.
"Silence!" bellowed Daddy Eko. "Only one person should talk."
"She has a bead stuck in her nose." the sunday school teacher said.
"Is that all?" her mother asked, sighing in releif. "She didn't beat anybody? Didnt steal anything?"
"No Ma." replied the man. "She's a good girl. That's why we're all so concerned."
"I hope there are other teachers with the remaining kids, seeing as many of you as this." Daddy Eko said.
"Yes there are sir." replied the teacher as he realized that only the instructor on the stage didnt follow them to Ajibike's house.
"We will be taking our leave now." he added. "Are you taking her to the hospital?"
"Something stuck in her nose you say?" repeated Daddy Eko as he stroked his thick moustache in thought. "That should be easy to pull out."
"Madam can I get a hairpin?" he asked the mother, who promptly ran into the rooms to get one. She was back seconds later with a black thin piece.
"Thank you." he muttered, as he collected it from her shaking fingers. "Ajibike, come here."
the girl ran to him gaily, smiling.
"Now I want you to do something for me." he said in a softer voice. He waited until her distracted eyes focused on him again before adding, “Stay still. I am going to try to bring out the bead in your nose with this pin. I wont hurt you, but you must stay still so that I can do it properly, ok?”
Little Ajibike nodded in understanding. She looked around again, wondering what the problem was. Her mother looked ready to burst into tears, while her father face held a grim expression. If she didn’t know better she would have thought he wanted to beat her, but she didn’t know what her crime was this time. Surely the bead stuck in her nose was not going to kill her. Couldn’t they all see that she could still smile and talk?
After thirty minutes of gentle rummaging, Daddy Eko raised his eyes to her father and shook his head slightly. Then he asked Ajibike for a favor.
“Breath out like this” And he breathed out.
Ajibike savored the attention she was getting from her Daddy Eko as usual, and obeyed. She breathed in, then she breathed out. Her mother raised her hands to her head and began a silent wail. Her father rubbed her mother’s back and whispered calming noises that Ajibike could barely hear above the din the Sunday school teachers raised at her actions.
Ajibike looked confused. Why did they start shouting? Didn’t they see that she was trying to emulate the deep breath her Daddy Eko just breathed out?
As always, Daddy Eko understood her young mind.
“Don’t try to do it as deep as I did,” he said. “Just breath out with force, you understand?”
She nodded vigorously.
“Now breath out.” He ordered.
She breathed out.
“Harder, Ajibike” he added.
Since there was not enough to breath harder, she breathed in, then out. Her mother started crying seriously.
Daddy Eko pulled Ajibike into a hug then rose from his seat. He and her father thanked the teachers profusely and ushered them to the door. When they were gone, he turned to his friend.
“We have to go to the hospital.” He said. “The bead is round and her nostril is too tiny. They might have to do an operation to get it out though.”
At the word ‘operation’ her mother’s cries grew louder.
“Daddy Eko,” Ajibike said for the first time since she was brought home. “What is wrong with my mummy?”
“She has plenty water in her eyes,” her father replied. “Where is your shoe?”
“It cut.” She replied.
“Go and get another one and lets go.” He ordered.
By the time she had found a complete pair, her mother’s crying had stopped. She came out and handed them to her mother.
“Mummy please help me wear my shoes,” she said. The mother quietly complied.
They entered the hospital through the emergency entrance. When the nurses saw what the emergency was, they began to rush.

=-----------=
THREE HOURS LATER
“Has she woken up yet?” the British doctor interrupted his assistant’s explanation of the procedure they had almost performed on Ajibike.
“She’s stirring sir” the assistant replied, glancing at the girl in her arms, before continuing, “We were supposed to make the incision just above where the bead was stuck, then cut downwards until it could drop freely, but something happened. We could not find the knife to make the incision. This was not possible as I had supervised the cleaning of the tools myself, we were wondering what to do as we had already applied anesthesia and everything, when Dr. Graham interrupted us and asked, “Why not make her sneeze?””
“That was it! By the second sneeze the bead had popped out of her nose, just like that!”
Ajibike’s mother was so relieved that her baby’s nose had not been cut open, she was smiling and praying in Yoruba in short bursts. She prayed for Dr. Graham’s great-grandchildren and Dr. Ogochuckwu’s great great grand children.
Dr. Graham’s attention was more focused on the child that was awakening in Dr. Ogochukwu’s arms. He waited for Ajibike to raise herself and glance around at the people standing over her before he spoke again.
“Little lady,” he said. “If you ever get anything stuck in your nose again, you will meet me in the theatre.”
Then he motioned with his fingers, “I’ll snip snip your nose to get it out.” He didn’t smile as Ajibike shuddered in fear.
To this day, those hairy fingers, making the scissors motion are still vivid in Ajibike’s mind, and she never ever touches her nose with anything, not even a flower.

Bosi Gbangba pt4

Sorry folks, I know this has been long over-due. You can read part 1, part 2 and part 3 first.
=-------=

"What do you think happened?" asked her husband as he joined her on the balcony to watch the coming procession.
"I don't know," she replied, "but it cant be good for 7 people to be carrying our daughter home."
"She's alive isnt she?" the father mused. "Then it can't be that bad. Just calm down."
Thirty minutes later he wasn't sure of his conclusion anymore. The crowd had arrived and were taking up the space in his living room. When he asked what the problem was, they all tried to explain at once.
"Silence!" bellowed Daddy Eko. "Only one person should talk."
"She has a bead stuck in her nose." the sunday school teacher said.
"Is that all?" her mother asked, sighing in releif. "She didn't beat anybody? Didnt steal anything?"
"No Ma." replied the man. "She's a good girl. That's why we're all so concerned."
"I hope there are other teachers with the remaining kids, seeing as many of you as this." Daddy Eko said.
"Yes there are sir." replied the teacher as he realized that only the instructor on the stage didnt follow them to Ajibike's house.
"We will be taking our leave now." he added. "Are you taking her to the hospital?"
"Something stuck in her nose you say?" repeated Daddy Eko as he stroked his thick moustache in thought. "That should be easy to pull out."
"Madam can I get a hairpin?" he asked the mother, who promptly ran into the rooms to get one. She was back seconds later with a black thin piece.
"Thank you." he muttered, as he collected it from her shaking fingers. "Ajibike, come here."
the girl ran to him gaily, smiling.
"Now I want you to do something for me." he said in a softer voice. He waited until her distracted eyes focused on him again before adding, “Stay still. I am going to try to bring out the bead in your nose with this pin. I wont hurt you, but you must stay still so that I can do it properly, ok?”
Little Ajibike nodded in understanding. She looked around again, wondering what the problem was. Her mother looked ready to burst into tears, while her father face held a grim expression. If she didn’t know better she would have thought he wanted to beat her, but she didn’t know what her crime was this time. Surely the bead stuck in her nose was not going to kill her. Couldn’t they all see that she could still smile and talk?
After thirty minutes of gentle rummaging, Daddy Eko raised his eyes to her father and shook his head slightly. Then he asked Ajibike for a favor.
“Breath out like this” And he breathed out.
Ajibike savored the attention she was getting from her Daddy Eko as usual, and obeyed. She breathed in, then she breathed out. Her mother raised her hands to her head and began a silent wail. Her father rubbed her mother’s back and whispered calming noises that Ajibike could barely hear above the din the Sunday school teachers raised at her actions.
Ajibike looked confused. Why did they start shouting? Didn’t they see that she was trying to emulate the deep breath her Daddy Eko just breathed out?
As always, Daddy Eko understood her young mind.
“Don’t try to do it as deep as I did,” he said. “Just breath out with force, you understand?”
She nodded vigorously.
“Now breath out.” He ordered.
She breathed out.
“Harder, Ajibike” he added.
Since there was not enough to breath harder, she breathed in, then out. Her mother started crying seriously.
Daddy Eko pulled Ajibike into a hug then rose from his seat. He and her father thanked the teachers profusely and ushered them to the door. When they were gone, he turned to his friend.
“We have to go to the hospital.” He said. “The bead is round and her nostril is too tiny. They might have to do an operation to get it out though.”
At the word ‘operation’ her mother’s cries grew louder.
“Daddy Eko,” Ajibike said for the first time since she was brought home. “What is wrong with my mummy?”
“She has plenty water in her eyes,” her father replied. “Where is your shoe?”
“It cut.” She replied.
“Go and get another one and lets go.” He ordered.
By the time she had found a complete pair, her mother’s crying had stopped. She came out and handed them to her mother.
“Mummy please help me wear my shoes,” she said. The mother quietly complied.
They entered the hospital through the emergency entrance. When the nurses saw what the emergency was, they began to rush.

=-----------=
THREE HOURS LATER
“Has she woken up yet?” the British doctor interrupted his assistant’s explanation of the procedure they had almost performed on Ajibike.
“She’s stirring sir” the assistant replied, glancing at the girl in her arms, before continuing, “We were supposed to make the incision just above where the bead was stuck, then cut downwards until it could drop freely, but something happened. We could not find the knife to make the incision. This was not possible as I had supervised the cleaning of the tools myself, we were wondering what to do as we had already applied anesthesia and everything, when Dr. Graham interrupted us and asked, “Why not make her sneeze?””
“That was it! By the second sneeze the bead had popped out of her nose, just like that!”
Ajibike’s mother was so relieved that her baby’s nose had not been cut open, she was smiling and praying in Yoruba in short bursts. She prayed for Dr. Graham’s great-grandchildren and Dr. Ogochuckwu’s great great grand children.
Dr. Graham’s attention was more focused on the child that was awakening in Dr. Ogochukwu’s arms. He waited for Ajibike to raise herself and glance around at the people standing over her before he spoke again.
“Little lady,” he said. “If you ever get anything stuck in your nose again, you will meet me in the theatre.”
Then he motioned with his fingers, “I’ll snip snip your nose to get it out.” He didn’t smile as Ajibike shuddered in fear.
To this day, those hairy fingers, making the scissors motion are still vivid in Ajibike’s mind, and she never ever touches her nose with anything, not even a flower.

Bosi gbangba pt 1

The man rubbed his head again in anguish, then rubbed his aching eyes, before resuming his pacing. Back and forth he paced in the waiting corridor, ignoring the pitying glances that passersby sent his way. Everytime a doctor approached he looked at their faces intently, dreading bad news.
They had already lost one baby. This unexpected one had been a God - given miracle, and now it seemed it was only a teaser.
He smiled as he remembered his wife's facial expression when the doctor had told her that her illness was another baby, not malaria. But that was four months ago. Now he had had to rush her to the emergency room because she had fainted.
He had stepped down to the car to pick something, only to return and find her on the floor.

"Hello sir," the approaching doctor asked. "Are you the husband of the woman in the theatre right now?"
"Yes, Yes," he said in a rush. "I am. What happened?"
"We are sorry about the.." the doctor began, but had to pause when the man began to cry.
"Wait sir!" The doctor exclaimed. "She still alive!"
The man looked up instantly. "She is alive?" he asked, trying to believe the words that came out of his ears.
"Yes she is sir," the doctor repeated. "I just came to tell you that you have to sign some papers. She has to be operated. I want to explain the situation to you sir, but you have to calm down and listen carefully."
"Am listening" the man replied as he walked with the doctor towards the theatre.
"Ok. We have to operate to remove the baby. I understand that the approximate duration of the pregnancy is just over six months right?"
"We are not really sure." The man responded.
"Then it might not be developed enough to survive." The doctor said."We are on a race to save your wife's life. That is what we hope to achieve. We will try our best but saving your wife's life is the goal. Do you understand?"
"Yes I do."the man replied. "Please save her."
Three hours later the man was called into the theatre.
"Your wife is fine now sir." The doctor assured him. "She will be resting now."
"Thank God!" the man sobbed again.
"And that is your baby" the doctor added. "Its a girl, and she's alive and kicking."
The man glanced in the direction the doctor was pointing to, and saw a nurse motioning for him to come closer. He peered at the tiny form in her arms, all bloody and wriggling the tiniest arms and legs he had ever seen.
"She's barely seven months old." the doctor said.
"Baby" moaned the wife.
They all glanced at the bed, the nurse hurrying to her side to show her the child.
She stared at it for a few minutes, then turned to her husband and asked,
"Are her toes complete?"
He nodded in response.
"And her fingers?" He nodded again.
"Thank God" she muttered before falling asleep again.
At 1.6kg, not longer than an Africola bottle, Ajibike was born, on the 23rd of September.

Bosi gbangba pt 1

The man rubbed his head again in anguish, then rubbed his aching eyes, before resuming his pacing. Back and forth he paced in the waiting corridor, ignoring the pitying glances that passersby sent his way. Everytime a doctor approached he looked at their faces intently, dreading bad news.
They had already lost one baby. This unexpected one had been a God - given miracle, and now it seemed it was only a teaser.
He smiled as he remembered his wife's facial expression when the doctor had told her that her illness was another baby, not malaria. But that was four months ago. Now he had had to rush her to the emergency room because she had fainted.
He had stepped down to the car to pick something, only to return and find her on the floor.

"Hello sir," the approaching doctor asked. "Are you the husband of the woman in the theatre right now?"
"Yes, Yes," he said in a rush. "I am. What happened?"
"We are sorry about the.." the doctor began, but had to pause when the man began to cry.
"Wait sir!" The doctor exclaimed. "She still alive!"
The man looked up instantly. "She is alive?" he asked, trying to believe the words that came out of his ears.
"Yes she is sir," the doctor repeated. "I just came to tell you that you have to sign some papers. She has to be operated. I want to explain the situation to you sir, but you have to calm down and listen carefully."
"Am listening" the man replied as he walked with the doctor towards the theatre.
"Ok. We have to operate to remove the baby. I understand that the approximate duration of the pregnancy is just over six months right?"
"We are not really sure." The man responded.
"Then it might not be developed enough to survive." The doctor said."We are on a race to save your wife's life. That is what we hope to achieve. We will try our best but saving your wife's life is the goal. Do you understand?"
"Yes I do."the man replied. "Please save her."
Three hours later the man was called into the theatre.
"Your wife is fine now sir." The doctor assured him. "She will be resting now."
"Thank God!" the man sobbed again.
"And that is your baby" the doctor added. "Its a girl, and she's alive and kicking."
The man glanced in the direction the doctor was pointing to, and saw a nurse motioning for him to come closer. He peered at the tiny form in her arms, all bloody and wriggling the tiniest arms and legs he had ever seen.
"She's barely seven months old." the doctor said.
"Baby" moaned the wife.
They all glanced at the bed, the nurse hurrying to her side to show her the child.
She stared at it for a few minutes, then turned to her husband and asked,
"Are her toes complete?"
He nodded in response.
"And her fingers?" He nodded again.
"Thank God" she muttered before falling asleep again.
At 1.6kg, not longer than an Africola bottle, Ajibike was born, on the 23rd of September.