Good Deed.

“We owe it to ourselves and to the next generation to conserve the environment so that we can bequeath our children a sustainable world that benefits all”.

Wangari Maathai
I am a lover of nature. When I started building my house, I planted some trees. Some are alive and some died, reasons I do not really know. Things have changed, my father gave me a different piece of land to start it all over again. I felt it was good to plant a tree. I scouted the location, the stones represent the location where a tree once stood. This was my prefered location with the hope that things will be different this time round. I visited a small tree nursery which is a few minutes from my fathers house. There were many trees there I was spoilt for choice. My wife looked at this pine, she fell in love with it. We made a decision, to carry it. It costed us Ksh.150 about $2.   With the position ready, it was time for me to sink the tree to the earth. With pride I did it, and nurtured its surrounding to make it comfortable in its new home. When you plant a tree, and care for it, it will one day provide a shade, firewood to keep you warm, welcome rain at your doors or even roof your grandson’s house. It’s good to plant trees.

Good deed: Ich wähle sauber!

Bei großartigem Wetter durfte ich an diesem Sonntag an einer weiteren Müllsammel-Aktion im Kölner Stadtraum teilnehmen und dieses Mal nicht nur durch Müllsammeln unterstützen, sondern zusätzlich mit dem Druck eines Banners mit dem Slogan "Ich wähle sauber!". Passend zum Wahlsonntag waren alle Kölner am Aachener Weiher eingeladen, ein sauberes Köln zu wählen, sich am Müllsammeln zu beteiligen oder sich am Infostand über Möglichkeiten zur Müllvermeidung zu informieren. Für jeden Sack gesammelten Mülls gab es ein Kölsch oder eine Fassbrause im Tausch, dazu Live-Musik, Snacks und kostenlose Handschuhe sowie Müllsäcke. Die Müllsäcke füllten sich schnell, es waren viele Helfer da und diverse absurde Müllfunde gaben mal wieder Anlass zum Grübeln. Wie kommt die Ukulele in den Wald und wer hat seine Orchidee hier vergessen?
Unterstützt, bzw. organisiert wurde die Aktion unter anderem von diesen Leuten: Tante Olga - Kölns 1. Unverpackt Laden The Good Food Und hier noch der Link zur Veranstaltung.
 

Updates on the 5 units to educate 100,000 people in Uganda about technology.

Introduction

For about 7 years, I face technology challenges many of which am fortunately able to solve due because of the repeated usage of computers, tech gadgets and the internet.

Some of the challenges are education, health and income generation related.

Technology doesn’t only help me keep in touch with the people that matter, it also gives me the chance to learn, earn income, educate others and contribute in different ways to community development.

With gratitude am happy to:- to participate in the designing of websites such as eastafricatourismguide.com, theelephanthome.com, africawildexplorations.com, ugandatrip.org, rubonicamp.com, homesteadtoursandsafaris.com and ucota.or.ug among others. Perhaps some of you reading this article have ever visited Uganda through one of those websites. The existence of the businesses and organisations which own those websites are helping reduce unemployment and provide a way for numerous people to earn an income in Uganda.

I have also been able to build financial business website like rapidadvisory.com, personal websites like kaweesimark.com, bboydancemachine.com, joramc.com, and kibuukaphotography.com other websites are directory sort of such as kansanga.com which is a free platform where a locals in my township can lookup or upload businesses, places etc.

One of the reasons I’m a web developer is to solve real life problems such as lack of accessibility to affordable means of marketing and business opportunities as well to help brands establish a presence on the internet.

Through experience, I have discovered that people are spending a great deal of funds and time to a lot important and useless things due to lack of technology skill and knowledge. Some people spend on expensive web tools to build good looking websites but they don’t have a budget set a side for marketing and maintenance of their websites.

Some people would easily have time to edit and upload content to their websites but they lack technology skill and the confidence to pull it off.

Currently some good number of Ugandans, have managed to get an income opportunities abroad in the other parts of the world and they would love to send money back home, safely, fast and securely which could be easily done through platforms such as useremit.com and worldremit.com  etc but the confidence that they can do it without a mistake is in lack.

What do I do?

A few years ago, with two friends, we found a company discovering the opportunities availed by technology. The business we initiated in 2014 to celebrate 3 birthdays and established itself as fully legally recognized business in Uganda. We started with the capital of less than UGX 300,000/= ( about $80 USD).

From two individuals to six full time employees, in an economically stricken market, we are persevering. We are strategically located in the center of Kampala capital city, at the heart of the printing industry in the country on Mirembe Arcade, 4th floor, office number E09 at Nasser Road which helps customers locate us easily for bespoke products and services helping their businesses grow and become or maintain sustainability.

Additionally I volunteer to educate people of all walks of life and introduce them to the technology since I have developed from someone who couldn’t afford food worth 1000/= ($0.27) to someone is sustaining myself.  The tech training I offer covers, introduction to computer usage, internet, coding through HTML, CSS, JS and PHP and Website design using Content Management Systems especially WordPress and Joomla. As I have many less tech skilled friends and people in my network, I sometimes help with troubleshooting their devices or offering tips for whatever they stumble with the gadgets and software systems they use.

A self question

Looking where I am from, where would I be without the help of the people with a good heart? How can I pay it forward?

A self answer

I should volunteer more often reaching out those who can’t afford tech education at school or paid for training centers.

The progress so far

At the beginning, what was a virtual dream, is becoming a reality.

Have been able to acquire two used laptops at an affordable fee from a friend who deals in selling used computers.

A few weeks ago I was able to set these laptops up by installing Windows OS, Microsoft office suite, typing master and web browsers. Those tools will be enough to get some started with technology.

I appreciate that some few friends have believed in the idea and are willing to involve as trainers, project ambassadors, pilot program hosts and website hosting partners among other responsibilities.

When do we roll out?

I will bring more updates next week.

Conclusion

This will be the first official fully packaged program am heading to impact social change and community development. I have little experience and exposure in managing such a program thus I kindly request for any of your suggestions and ideas.

Thanks for reading.

 

 

 

 

 


Good Deed: The Web that binds us part 2

Earlier in the year, I connected my dad to the angel who ensured he had an education, thanks to Facebook. Some weeks after posting an answer on Quora, something told me to go to Facebook and check out the daughters timelines. One of them had actually posted pictures of Pastor Moon, asking that we all call him to cheer him up, as he was battling cancer. I told my dad, who insisted I ask for permission from one of the daughters, before he would call. My dad would call, and chat with the pastor for a while. Pastor Moon's health got a boost, and he was extremely happy that Dad called him (Whoever said our health is not connected to our emotions lied). That was March. Continue reading "Good Deed: The Web that binds us part 2"

Good Deed: The Web that binds us part 1

Some months ago, I answered a question on Quora: What's the nicest thing anyone has ever done for you. Here is a recap of the relevant part of my answer below:
My dad was the last of four kids by his mum, and while he was still a toddler, his rich and influential dad changed towards them all, refused to send the other kids to school and focused on his younger wife. So they all had to do odd jobs to even survive. My dad barely finished primary school as a result of this. His eldest sibling, also male, was way older than him, so he had finished his education before all this, and was working at the Seventh-Day Adventist Hospital in Ile-Ife, Osun state, Nigeria. One day he heard that one of the missionaries needed someone to help around the house (here in Nigeria we call them houseboy or housegirl), and he went and got my dad to fill the position. By then my dad had already left the rich-boy attitude behind due to the hardship of surviving, so taking the post was no big deal. In fact, he had been at home for years, always learning a trade, not having enough money to graduate afterwards, and picking up another. He was a good carpenter, tire-repairer, plumber, and cement-mixer…lol. Anyway, it turned out that the missionary (Pastor Moon) could speak his native language of Yoruba even better than him, which meant communication was easy for him, as he barely grasped English from primary school. One day, my dad noticed a bottle of groundnuts/peanuts in the kitchen. Being his favorite snack, he thought nothing of grabbing the bottle and shaking out some. Unknown to him the Mrs. Moon had seen him. Later, she called him and asked if he took the nuts, and he simply told the truth. She was shocked. Apparently he was not the first househelp the Moons had had, and the previous ones had stolen from them. Months later, Pastor Moon calls my dad, and tells him that his wife is pregnant. The news did not sound out of place until the man tells my dad that they had been trying to conceive for a very very long time. He says he has a gift for my dad. He wanted my dad to go back to school. My dad refused. He was almost 21 by then, and the thought of sitting in school with kids did not sit well with him. The man coaxed my dad until he agreed, and he paid the school fees. Even when he had to travel back to the USA, he kept sending the money. If my dad had not gone to secondary school:
  • he would never furthered his studies, or raised his mum and sisters out of the poverty they experienced.
  • he would never have have met my mum. They met after university, during their compulsory national service in Nigeria.
  • he would never have met his future employer (another helper), who sponsored my brother and I through secondary school, decades later, on a scholarship. The man had been my dad’s junior in that school.
  • I would never have met my husband, as I would have gone to another school entirely. We first met in high school, and the shared memories and friends we have is what solidified our friendship and union.
A few years back, thanks to Facebook, and a few mutual friends (my dad was not the only one Pastor Moon had helped) I was able to reach out to two of his kids. They call me their niece now :) In 2014, on Pastor Moon’s birthday, I got to call him and thank him so much for being the kind heart he is. He and his wife remembered my father and were deeply touched. He was happy to hear my dad was also living in the USA and requested that my dad call him up asap. He did. Pastor Moon said something that day that struck me and made me cry: “Thank you for thanking me. No one else ever remembered to say thank you. God bless you.” I am so happy I was able to connect my dad to the man who ensured he had an education. I go out of my way to help anyone, daily. One never knows the impact of just a little assistance in another human’s life.

GOOD DEED: THE OKADA RIDER

Akara and Fried Yam, Courtesty Pinterest (Nigerian Foodies)
GOOD DEED: THE OKADA RIDER Some nights ago, I closed late and so I had to patronize an okada rider. For those outside the shores of Nigeria, we have what we call okada riders in almost every city in our country. Imagine someone with a motorcycle, carrying passengers for a fee. That's an okada rider. At first they were a new means of livelihood for many, then they became a nuisance, especially when they were being used for robberies and attacks. Various cities now have laws governing their working times and where they can operate, if at all. Okada riders are allowed to patronize the areas where my office is, and where I live, so its quite easy for me to use them from one location to the other. So, on that night, I hailed one of these 'transporters' to take me home. After negotiating the price, the man asked how much I was holding. It turns out he would need to break down the money he had to be able to give me change when we arrived my destination, so we agreed that he would stop along the way to buy bread. He did stop some minutes later, but not for bread. He stopped at a street food location, where fried yam, fried bean cakes (akara) and fried plantain (dodo) was being sold. The smell arrested me immediately. I seem to love yam with a passion these days, and that day was no exception. It did not even matter that all I had eaten all day was roasted yam and pepper sauce. I ordered some, then paid for both my order and the okada man's order. The man did not believe I was not going to collect the money back from him. I insisted, and when we arrived at my house, I proceeded to pay him the full charge agreed for the trip. He prayed for me fervently and I thanked him and walked away. I still do not understand why he did not believe me. I mean, I said I would pay and I did. I enjoyed my order. You should try it one day - african white yam, deep fried in vegetable oil, served with pepper sauce and chilled water...hmmm.... I better stop here before hunger knocks fully on my door.

Good Deeds: Epitome Products

Its not easy when you have bills hanging over your head. My subconscious is cruel, it keeps bringing it to the forefront of my mind, day after day. Thanks to the daily reminders, I cannot stand even a little debt because it would weigh a ton on my mind, and make me distracted. All this talk of debt and bills came about because I owe 25 Euros. Yes, Euros.

Why should I be energetic for 2017?

2016 is a memory. Full of personal and business challenges, surprises and milestones. The opportunities,  that it brought such as the “Dine and Dream” and Unleash dreams workshops for free of charge. Over 4 districts of Uganda traveled to educate fellow youths about entrepreneurship & personal development, the networks built, the websites designed and mobile app development opportunity scoped are one of those that make me feel energized for 2017. The first time I applied for a fellowship, can’t wait for feedback. Fingers crossed. More reason to be energized is the goal am setting to learn more about youths and women empowerment, human rights, violence and entrepreneurship in all. To mentor and support at least 2 young entrepreneurs run self sustaining businesses is what I stand for. I live to inspire individuals to build awareness and self-sustaining communities. So the more knowledge I give, the inspirations I make, the support I give is what keeps me stronger as well as make others stronger. Looking forward to this challenge. In 2016 most of my workshops have been in Central and Eastern Uganda, connecting to Western and Northern Uganda will be courageous.  

Good Deeds, PayStack and Cre8SMS

Anyone running a business that needs foreign exchange, especially with the American dollar, in Nigeria, is currently frustrated. The exchange rates have practically tripled in months, making production costs crazy, and turning profits to heavy losses.

IronBlogger – My Good Deed

It goes without saying, that when you are selling something, it is essential to also patronize your product. In Daydah’s case, one of the services we provide for clients, is online visibility through blogging, social media activities and more.