DIY Joomla! 3 One-Page site

I have always been fascinated by the fluidity one can find with one-page web themes. While common in Wordpress, one-page web templates were not the usual in Joomla!. I put the task of understanding them, and replicating such in Joomla, on my bucketlist last year, but I did not have cause to actually do either until recently when a client asked for it.
I turned to my good friend, Google, for help, and I found an answer on Joomla Stack Exchange channel that helped a lot (Thanks Sir Rene Korss!).

BREAKING DOWN THE WONDER OF THE ONE-PAGE SITE

The concept is to
  • place several modules on the home page, with different displays,
  • then create hyperlinks that, when enhanced with a sprinkling of java script, scroll to those modules smoothly.
Joomla! already has functionality for modules, and each template has varied types and position names. The twist here is to be able to call the module IDs within the designated hyperlink.
By carrying out the following steps, we can make any Joomla template, behave like a one-page theme:

1. Create a module chrome

A module chrome is the shell (usually with div, span or paragraph tags), surrounding each module. While there are default module chromes within the system folder inside templates, your new template probably has its own, that make the modules display how the template creator wants them to. It's quite easy to make your own custom module chrome, but the point here is to use a referable value in the initial tag's id, that you can call up later.

See an example below:
  1. Create a file called modules.php in the folder
    yoursitedirectory/templates/yourchosentemplate/html
  2. Add the following code to the file:
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    <?php
    /**
    Additional template module chrome(s)
    **/
    defined('_JEXEC') or die;

    /*
    * one page layout (output module content in one page layout)
    */
    function modChrome_onepager($module, &$params, &$attribs)
    { ?>
    <div id="slot-<?php echo $module->id; ?>">
    <!-- Module content here -->
    <?php echo $module->content; ?>
    <span style="margin-bottom: 5px;">&nbsp;</span>
    </div>
    <?php } ?>
As illustrated above, the chrome is named modChrome_onepager, the div tag is the first tag within it, and its id uses a referable value, in this case, it calls the current module's id (module->id). I added the word, 'slot-' to the name, but you can use any value or format. Add any other optional frills to the module chrome.

2. Create your modules

Set up all the modules that will act as sections for the one-page theme. For example, let's assume that your proposed links are Home, About us, Our Services, and Contact us. Home section is the part of that the site visitor sees upon opening the site for the first time, so that's taken care of. You need to create modules for the other links, namely, About us, Our Services, and Contact us. Set them to show on the Home page, under your menu assignments.
Very important: Ensure that in each module, the module chrome you created in step 1 is selected. You can select a module chrome type under 'Advanced' tab, from the list tagged, Module Style.

3. Create the hyperlink menus

Go to Menus, and create external links, with the URL specified as the module names e.g. slot-22. 

Add the Javascript magic

 The script to use is from Paulund.co.uk and it allows a smooth scroll between the hyperlinks.

 ADDING A LITTLE EXTRA

  •  its preferable that you create your module chrome inside the systems folder, instead of inside the particular template folder. This is for occasions in which you have to change the template - the code should still work regardless of the change.
  • If its not in the template already, consider adding an arrow that leads back to the top of the page, at the right hand side corner of the screen. 

Want to check already-made one page Joomla! templates? Check out this collection at Evohosting.co.uk

A chilly Joomla! Day in Arusha.

WhatsApp Image 2017-07-06 at 12.02.08 Welcome to Arusha, the town so calm, so beautiful, so welcoming. You should come here, if you can afford it. Endless queues of tourist are arriving here in their numbers….you wonder why, but when you are here, everything makes sense, makes peace. Driving in Arusha I can see how a large, sprawling city with all of the contradictions that brings, it is, the best place to be. The traffic police standing on the street in their white uniform, very white my friend asked how they wash it, they keep it white, just like new. Continue reading "A chilly Joomla! Day in Arusha."

On Comminity leadership.

The #Jab17 was an opportunity for several of our newly-elected members of Joomla’s leadership to meet their counterparts in other major projects, some CMS-related but most not CMS related.  From Joomla we had Mike “Demo” Demopolous, Joomla’s Treasurer; Yves Hoppe, Department Coordinator for Programs; Rowan Hoskyns-Abrahall, Department Coordinator for Events; and Robert Jacobi as our President.  Since this group was recently elected, it also presented valuable time in the evening and following the conference to get to know each other and discuss the important priorities for their departments.

The main take-aways from this event included ideas for maintaining the health of communities formed of contributors that put in just a couple hours a week.  The unconference format allows those attending the event to propose topics that are of common concern.  A room and time is assigned and any attendees that have similar concerns or solutions to suggest meet and share those ideas.  The topics attracting the most attention and attendance included:

 

  • how to “onboard” our newest contributors to make sure their first attempts to contribute to documentation or user support are a success and that first attempts to submit a Pull Request to improve the software are properly mentored and result in a successful and positive experience;
  • how to communicate effectively to a diverse community that is spread across continents, time zones and languages;
  • how to prevent burn-out of volunteers that have moved into critical leadership roles, especially release managers;
  • how to create a culture that teachs new contributors the “right way” to contribute in a way that does not embarass or discourage them; and
  • how to build succession into the responsibilities of each leader so that fresh enthusiastic faces can rise quickly in an organization and not be discouraged by long-term leaders that have lost some of their energy.

I joined the #jCycle #Joomla Challenge

Last week I joined the Joomla #jcycle challenge! It’s a kind of charity for the Joomla project.

Cycling is a great way to raise money for charity. Our season sponsor joins this effort and donates by tradition 1 cent for every km ridden.

If you like Joomla! and cycling, and you want to do something good, here is your chance!

I like #joomla and since Oktober 1th I have to commute from Bad Homburg to Frankfurt. Each ride is about 20km, which means 20 Euro Cents for the Joomla project.

The jCycle challenge happens on Endomondo, a platform to track your rides. Unfortunately I use Strava, so I thought it was not possible to join the challenge. But Radek Suski had an idea:

So I did!

https://tapiriik.com
https://tapiriik.com

This month I contributed 632 km …

Current month
Current month

which means, that the Joomla project will receive 6,32 Euro more. If it’s possible, I take a photo every day and tweet it

And I’m already at place 25 – I’m so proud!

Charts
Charts

Even your are (like me) a little bit late to the party, the challenge lasts until the end of 2016, so join us!

The post I joined the #jCycle #Joomla Challenge appeared first on Hagen Graf.

Don’t just code, solve problems

Joomla! Day Kenya happened this weekend on 17th Sept and I got to learn a lot, both as part of the organizing team and as an attendee listening to what the speakers had to offer. The importance of team work can not be understated when organizing such an event.Human interaction however simple can prove taunting […]

JoomlaDay Kenya 2016, a great

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Greetings from The Joomla! Community in Kenya. The fourth annual JoomlaDay Kenya hosted by the Joomla Community in collaboration with CMSAfrica was hosted by Strathmore University. @iLabAfrica is a Centre of Excel­lence in ICT innov­a­tion and Devel­op­ment based at Strath­more Uni­ver­sity. It was estab­lished to address the Mil­len­nium Devel­op­ment Goals(MDGs) and to con­trib­ute toward Kenya’s Vis­ion 2030. The research cen­ter is involved in inter­dis­cip­lin­ary research, stu­dents engage­ment, col­lab­or­a­tion with gov­ern­ment, industry and other fund­ing agen­cies.
Since the first in 2012, this conference has rapidly developed into an important forum where Joomla! ethosiasts can meet, have interactions and network with each other; where mattendees can cooparate and learn from tech exparts about the latest processes in technologies to deliever an even more efficient business. In today’s digital world, we download and upload tons of information from and to the internet. We visit millions of websites in our internet lifetime and sometimes, we even want to make one of our own. However, this could prove to be costly and you may not know how to go about it by yourself. This is where an immensely useful product called Joomla! comes into the picture. Put in simple terms, Joomla! is a software for making and updating a website in an easy way.

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The best part about Joomla! is that it requires no prior programming knowledge. This means that anyone can creat and develop a website in easiest possible manner. This is the massage we have tried to spread in all our Joomla! Events throughout East Africa. We have managed to bring enlightment on what joomla! can do and how the community work something that very few people know about. Among the topics where Joomla! 101, by Shadrack Serem, taking us through the Joomla!3.6 including the latest and greatest features from the developers supporting Joomla!, Creating a joomla component in 30 minutes, this was a practical talk which tusked the attendees to participate, learn and show their results, with two keynotes, Payments in Joomla! and Intergrating voice call API to Joomla!

We take this opportunity to thank our speakers who took their time to participate in this event and share their great knowledge to better others. Its a great sacrifice to make but for the community, it goes along way. In the same spirit, to our sponsors, the people who made this day a success, our host Open Source Matters, @iLabAfrica, CmsAfrica, Netrixs Business systems, NorrNext, Akeeba, Web357 and DJ-Extentions and Joomla Monsters. Your support has always gone a long way and we value your partinerships and hope that they will continue to grow and flourish. Joomla! Day may have ended, but the community is still active, look up for our meet-up, with our upcoming Joomla User Group coming in the early 2017. Its also important to announce that the 2017 CMS AFRICA SUMMIT will be held in Abuja Nigeria. for bookings please visit summit.cmsafrica.org. So see you in Abuja, Nigeria in 2017.

#jdayke16

@susumunyu

joomladay.or.ke


5. Create Content

Back to 4. It’s all about users, permissions, modules and articles

Creating content is hard! Every piece of content is a story. And a story can be good or not that good and thus attracting visitors or bore them. Thousands of books on the subject of writing stories have been published, a lot of people have taught the lore. 
I have a relatively easy task to cover just the technical part 🙂

What is an article in Joomla?

Technically, an article consists of

  • a title (headline) and an alias (in the url)
  • the text (a mixture of text, images, and other media)
  • a category where the article belongs to
  • additional tags to describe the article
  • an author and an alias for the author
  • access permissions
  • a language the article is written in
  • meta data for search engines and other robots

and a lot of options how, where, to whom and when the article is displayed.
 You already wrote an article in the last chapter and this was not complicated. Just a title is necessary, all the other fields have a default value or are optional.

Let’s go through this list 🙂

A Title

It’s a little, but an important part.

  • It needs to be crisp and short to attracts readers and it’s handy for you because the title appear in lists of articles on the website and as lists of articles in the control panel.
  • the title appears as the page title on top of your browser window and it can contain the site name too. You can configure this behaviour in 
System → Global Configuration → Site → SEO settings → Include Site Name in Page Titles
  • it can appear in the URL of that page and it’s up to you how to setup the URL
 System → Global configuration → Site → SEO settings.

The Text

In Joomla, the text of your article contains a part that is displayed in lists (teaser) and the rest of the article. This rest can be structured by page breaks, so that a long text results in 10 pages each with a table of content. But step by step :).

When you create an article you will do this with the help of an editor. Joomla uses a rich text editor (TinyMCE). That means, it is not necessary for you as the author to learn HTML tags. The editor looks like a text processor window on your PC (e.g. Word, LibreOffice) and it is easy to understand the icons (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Rich text editor
Figure 1: Rich text editor

 

If you hover over an icon with your mouse, there appears a tooltip with the description of the function the editor performs when the icon is clicked on

Note:

It is possible to install different editors, for example the Joomla Content Editor and it is also possible not to use any editor. Joomla itself comes with two editors and you can configure the default editor in System → Global Configuration → Site → Default Editor.

The default settings allow your users to choose between the available editors by themselves in their user account. You can disable this feature in Users → Manage → Options → Frontend User Parameters.  

Paste from Word

The worst case of editing happens, when people paste from programs like Microsoft Word. Even if the situation gets better there is still NO REAL WAY to get the same formats on a website that is based on HTML by pasting from a text processor like Microsoft Word that is based on binary formats or “complicated” XML. The editor offers a “Clean up messy code” icon but it will not clean up logical errors or differences in the markup. Please keep that in mind when you talk to your users 🙂

Insert Images

In the third row of the editor window you’ll find a button called images. It offers a dialog to choose existing images from your inbuild Joomla image library and it allows you to add images to this library by uploading them.

  • You can manage your library under Content → Media
  • You can drag images in the content window of the editor.
  • Joomla! will NOT resize your images, so be careful with big photos!
    The best solution: your images have exactly the size in pixel you want to have them on your site. There are several extensions available for solving the resize issue and the Twitter Bootstrap framework that is used in Joomla 3.x, is helpful for responsive images.

After you have inserted an image from the library, you can configure (add attributes to) that image by clicking the image icon on top of the rich text editor (Figure 2).

Figure 2: Using the rich text editor
Figure 2: Using the rich text editor

References to other articles

The button Article in the third row of the editor window allows to link from an article to another article which is quite useful. This feature requires the Editor group permission.

Read more

Articles will appear in lists and on an article details page. On lists, the text should be limited to avoid confusion. With the help of the Read More button you limit the article text. Set the cursor in your text where the Read More break should appear and click the Read More button (Figure 3).

Figure 3: Read More link
Figure 3: Read More link

Embed a YouTube video

This is not only about YouTube videos but it is a good example for text filters. If you try to embed a YouTube video with the typical code

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/UF8uR6Z6KLc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

you notice that it is filtered by the editor and by Joomla. This is not a bug! It’s a feature 🙂


For security reasons

Joomla uses so-called text filters (System → Global Configuration → Text Filters) to filter the following tags: ‘applet’, ‘body’, ‘bgsound’, ‘base’, ‘basefont’, ’embed’, ‘frame’, ‘frameset’, ‘head’, ‘html’, ‘id’, ‘iframe’, ‘ilayer’, ‘layer’, ‘link’, ‘meta’, ‘name’, ‘object’, ‘script’, ‘style’, ‘title’, ‘xml’.

Unfortunately, we need to insert an <iframe> tag to embed videos from YouTube (and several other services).

So, how can the problem be solved?

One solution could be to trust your authors and create a White List (System → Global Configuration → Text Filters) for the authors, editors and publishers group (Figure 4) and then tell TinyMCE the <iframe> is not evil anymore (Extensions → Plug-in Manager → Editor-TinyMCE → Edit → Plugin → Prohibited Elements) by deleting the word iframe in the prohibited elements field.

Figure 4: White List for several user groups
Figure 4: White List for several user groups

 

After you have changed these filter mechanisms, it is possible to copy and paste the embed code into your article. Keep in mind that you need to switch the editor to the HTML view by clicking the HTML source code icon (<>). Afterwards, a popup window with the HTML code of the article appears. Now paste the embed code where the video should appear (Figure 5).

Figure 5: Inserting the iframe code into the article
Figure 5: Inserting the iframe code into the article

 

Click the Ok button and you already can see the video inside the editor window. After saving the article the video will appear on your website (Figure 6).

Figure 6: Article with iframe code
Figure 6: Article with iframe code

 

Now you can embed code from several platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Flickr.

Using macros in a text

It is possible to use so called macros in your text. A macro is an expression or command that is replaced with something different (e.g the embed code of your YouTube video).
Theoretically, we could write in our article text (not in the HTML) something like this

and some magic could replace this with the appropriate embed code

<iframe width=”560″ height=”315″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/rX372ZwXOEM [105]” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

The only problem is that this transformation is not a part of the Joomla core package. If you want to use macros, you need to install additional extensions, mostly so called plug ins.

Content in a module?

When we created an article, we used the content component of Joomla. Another possibility to create content can be a module.
A module is a content element that can be positioned on your website. A menu, for example, needs a module to be displayed. The Login box is also a module. You can create as many modules with predefined functions as you need and position them in the predefined area in the template. Joomla comes with 24 pre-installed modules. You can see them with descriptions under Extensions → Modules → New (Figure 7).

Figure 7: Available Modules
Figure 7: Available Modules

 

It is possible to create a module that contains HTML text like an article (Custom module). And it is also possible to upload e.g. a background image for each module and to publish the module time based. It is not intended that custom HTML content in modules is created by “normal” authors. Content creation in modules is more a “Manager” or “Administrator” task. Try out the Custom HTML module. Create one, add some content and choose a position (Figure 8).

Figure 8: Custom HTML module in control panel
Figure 8: Custom HTML module in control panel

 

You can use the rich text editor and all the features that are available to write, format and enhance article text. You can even configure on which page the module should appear (tab Menu Assignment) and when it should appear (time based publishing). 
After saving, your custom HTML module appears on your site (Figure 9).

Figure 9: Custom HTML module on website
Figure 9: Custom HTML module on website

Figure 9: Custom HTML module on website

If more than one module is located at the same position it is necessary to bring them into the desired order. You have to choose a filter and click the filter icons once. After that, just drag the modules in the module manager to the desired place (Figure 10).

Figure 10: Reordering of modules
Figure 10: Reordering of modules

 

 

The post 5. Create Content appeared first on Hagen Graf.

Joomla Day Kenya is here.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES
Hagen Graf has for a long time written Joomla Books and still participates in Joomla and Tech. He lives in Fitou, together with his wife Christine.

Nairobi is a tech hub, not like the big stuff we see in the US and UK, but its starting and we are on our way there. Big innovations have been born here, and had a great impact in the world and the society. Tech thrives, commands business, improves business. PAYING for a taxi ride using your mobile phone is easier in Nairobi than it is in New York, thanks to Kenya’s world-leading mobile-money system, M-PESA. Launched in 2007 by Safaricom, the country’s largest mobile-network operator, it is now used by over 17m Kenyans, equivalent to more than two-thirds of the adult population; around 25% of the country’s gross national product flows through it. M-PESA lets people transfer cash using their phones, and is by far the most successful scheme of its type on earth. “Why does Kenya lead the world in mobile money”? This was a question in The Economist.

Nairobi, the capital city of Kenya, has transformed into a technology epicentre. An agile mobile banking system has created new market opportunities for digital entrepreneurs. 4G internet connections became more and more affordable and still are mobile payment services are booming up and the promising startup scene and ecosystem constantly is reinventing their offerings. Silicon Savannah has positioned itself as an epicentre of startup weekends, innovations meet ups, accelerators, incubator events and investors get together. True to that form, Nairobi has one of East Africa’s highest concentrations of US dollar millionaires accounting for 8400 in number as of 2016.

Kenya government at the forefront of technology development – investors are being lured to invest in Nairobi, and are heeding the call positively so and the city has positioned itself as an investor friendly city by being open to aid agencies, development funds and foreign NGO’s. The birth of M-Pesa revolution by Vodafone in 2003 and subsequent launch by Safaricom in 2007. This revolution inspired many to be tech entrepreneurs and proactively launch startups. The launch of iHub in 2010 – as an open space for startups, positioned Kenya’s capital, Nairobi as the future of startups, technology and innovation. Since then, we have seen the growth in shared spaces around the city.

@iLabAfrica is a Centre of Excel­lence in ICT innov­a­tion and Devel­op­ment based at Strath­more Uni­ver­sity. It was estab­lished to address the Mil­len­nium Devel­op­ment Goals(MDGs) and to con­trib­ute toward Kenya’s Vis­ion 2030. The research cen­ter is involved in inter­dis­cip­lin­ary research, stu­dents engage­ment, col­lab­or­a­tion with gov­ern­ment, industry and other fund­ing agen­cies. With a cli­ent list that includes some of the largest soft­ware engin­eer­ing and tele­com­mu­nic­a­tions com­pan­ies in the world, you can rest assured that your product devel­op­ment endeavors are in good hands with @iLabA­frica Whether you’re look­ing to aug­ment your exist­ing engineering team, or com­pletely out­source your soft­ware engin­eer­ing, you’ll find that iLabA­frica provides cost-effective solu­tions, cus­tom tailored to meet the needs of your business.

This will be the home of our fourth edition of Joomla Day Kenya, #jdayke16 which will be on 17th September 2016. The Secretariat for JDKE is proud to be working with @iLabafrica in making this event a success. Jommla day events brings together tech enthusiasts, developers, programmers and designers to a table of networking, interaction and learning. With great support from OSM, joomla day events have thrived and increased in cities all over the world. We welcome you to this great event, and we would like to thank our great sponsors without them it will not be possible to have this event. Open source Matters for great leadership and support for our Joomla Day Event, Akeeba Backup, Web357, NorrNext and Joomlashacks. @iLabafrica our host and venue sponsors for their great support. For those out there who wish to partner with us, our door is still open for you.

See you at the #jdayke16


4. It’s all about users, permissions, modules and articles

Back to 3. Design, Layout, Colors

I know, we still have no content on our site but before we create it, let’s have a look on the user accounts of our new Joomla website.
When you installed Joomla, you created the Super Administrator account. This user is allowed to do anything. It is nice to be that user but it is dangerous too. You will probably have more than one user account on your website, e.g. authors who write articles.

To get more used to these topics, let’s build a platform for authors where they can post articles and upload images without the need to enter Joomla’s control panel. Follow the example and you’ll learn a lot about Joomla 🙂

About users, roles and permissions

Users are in general able to login on the frontend and/or the control panel just depending on their role permissions. A user account has to be a member of a user group. Instead of assigning access permissions to each user, they are assigned to a group. The individual user is then assigned to one or more groups. Imagine you have 10,000 users in four different groups. It’s very easy for the administrator to change the permissions for each of the groups. Without groups, you would have to change every user account manually. However, when using groups, you only have to change permissions once!

Joomla comes with predefined groups like author and publisher which are easy to understand. An author is able to create/write something, a publisher has the additional permission to publish content.

  • The predefined frontend user groups are: visitors, registered users, authors, editors, publishers.
  • The predefined control panel user groups are: manager, administrator, super administrator

Example: A website where authors can post articles

This is a very simple workflow but it covers some possibilities that exist in Joomla. I assume that you have a “naked” Joomla without sample data and you have a super administrator user account.

The desirable scenario

  • Admin user in control panel:

    – activates the admin notification when someone creates a new user account

    – creates a user menu for registered users with a link to create an article
  • Visitor on website:

    – registers as a new user
  • Admin user in control panel:
    – 
receives a notification and assigns the user to the authors group
  • Author user on website:

    – is able to create an article but is not allowed to publish it
  • Admin user in control panel:
    
- receives a notification that there is new content available

    – publishes the article on the frontpage

Parameter and user menu

We have to set a few switches in the user options. Go to Users → Manage → Options and activate Allow User Registration and Notification Mail to Administrators (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Notification Mail to Administrators
Figure 1: Notification Mail to Administrators

 

Then we need a menu for logged in Users. Go to Menus → Manage → Create new menu and create one:

  • Title: User
  • Menu Type: user
  • Description: A menu for a user with useful links

Save and close it. You have now created a kind of menu container. What’s missing is the links inside the menu container and a linked module that displays the new menu at a certain position in the template.
 To create and link the module, click on the link Add a module for this menu type (Figure 2).

Figure 2: Add a module
Figure 2: Add a module

In the module form you have to add a title (User Menu), the position (Right – Position-7 in the Protostar template), the access permission (registered users). Don’t forget to save & close it (Figure 3).

Figure 3: Creating the user menu module
Figure 3: Creating the user menu module

 

Now we need the “Create article” link in our menu that should be shown to authors. Go to Menus → User → Add New Menu Item (Figure 4).

Figure 4: Creating a link in the user menu
Figure 4: Creating a link in the user menu

 

In the following form you have to enter the name/description of the link (Menu Item Title), select a Menu Item Type (Figure 5) and restrict the access to registered. Each Joomla component can provide Menu Item Types. Our type (create article) is provided by the content component which is a part of Joomla core.


Figure 5: Select Menu Item Type
Figure 5: Select Menu Item Type

 

After you saved and closed the dialog a new menu item should be displayed in the list (Figure 6).

Figure 6: User Menu with the new menu item
Figure 6: User Menu with the new menu item

Test your work! Login on the frontend with your super administrator account. After the login, our new user menu with the create link appears (Figure 7).

Figure 7: User Menu after Login
Figure 7: User Menu after Login

 

Please log out after the test.

Registration as a new user

Now we create a new user account. Please access the website as any other visitor and click the Create an account link. Fill out the form and click the Register button (Figure 8).

Figure 8: Registration form
Figure 8: Registration form

 

If your server stack allows sending emails, a notification email will be send to the email address of the super administrator account.

Joomla offers a CAPTCHA to prevent spammers. To use it, activate the CAPTCHA plugin under Extensions → Plugins and select it in the options of the User Manager where you can configure the general behaviour of the login process too.

Assignment of the new user to the authors group

Log in with your Administrator account on the control panel, access Users → Users and click on the name of the new user (Hagen Graf). Check the Author group in the Assigned User Groups tab (Figure 9).

Figure 9: Assignment of a group to a user
Figure 9: Assignment of a group to a user

Depending on your environment it might be necessary to enable and activate the new user account. Just click on the red icons to do so (Figure 10).

 

Figure 10: Activate and enable user
Figure 10: Activate and enable user

Now we have a new author on our website.

The new author creates an article

Now switch your identity to the one of the new author, log in with your new user account on the website and click the create article link. Just add a title and a few words and click save (Figure 11).

Figure 11: Create an article
Figure 11: Create an article

 

The article is saved and submitted but the user (you) cannot see it, because it is not published. I configured this workflow intentionally as in some cases it is desired to have another person to edit the created content and then publish it.

Of course, it is also possible to skip that, add the user to the group Publisher and then the article would be published immediately.

The admin publishes the article on the frontpage

Joomla comes with a messaging system and this system creates a message when new content was created by a user. Depending on your settings (Components → Messaging → Options) the admin receives that message by email or via the screen. 
The admin has to go to Content → Article Manager and publish the new article. If the article should appear on the frontpage, click on the featured icon (Figure 12, Figure 13).

Figure 12: Publish an Article
Figure 12: Publish an Article

 

Figure 12: Featured Article
Figure 12: Featured Article

Tweaking the process

As we already noticed while following this example, many topics are covered and the configuration is easily done depending on your needs. There is a huge amount of permissions, options and settings to discover.
I’ll provide a few examples in the following chapters.

Hotel Alimara

We were all sitting on a round table, with our laptops open, Radek looked down on his screen, his fingers hung over the edge of his keyboard as if his wrists were broken. I couldn’t blame him, for days he had worked hard to make sure that the event JandBeyond was a success. His brilliance reflected this independence as he regularly found his way through challenges with grace matched by only a handful of engineers in the world. Radek is Polish, but his wife Sigrid, while having dinner narrated to me how they met. He was working for her, and they fell in love in the process……..and it was a good thing she says. They got married in Poland, but he, Radek had to wait three months to be able to travel to Germany and be with his wife, then, there was no European Union. They now live and work in Germany, and they keep bees.

 

We were five of us hard at work in the conference hall of the Hotel Alimara in Barcelona, Spain. Our team since I joined had been working well, and this was the first time we would be all of us in one room. We are called Joomla Event Team, one of many teams working with Joomla.org. This regular website where millions of websites are born and it’s among the most trafficked website on earth. Radek as now you know him is our team leader, but he is also a member of other teams including the Joomla Event Travel (JET) a program he pioneered and is now very proud of. His passion for Joomla is evident, every morning he would display his coffee on a table that in inhabited by everything Joomla, and the mug would be Joomla too. At least that’s how I came to know him.

 

We are all developers, Sigrid who works with her husband Radek in Germany, keeps us alive, she organizes our meetings and work schedules. Rowan, the lady with a big heart working from her London apartment with a great view of the London city-none like her in London, Carlos, the polite but strict Spanish guy who also loves running, through his company working on different successful project and then me, the guy who cycles daily in Nairobi Kenya doing design and enterprise consultancy. But all our work in Joomla was invisible, hidden inside the glowing screens of our laptops. What no one could possibly know is at the click of a button from any of our web browser, we would launch features that would instantly have an impact on millions of people around the world, yet to the person sitting near me, for all they care, I was playing solitaire. Rowan once told me-and I say this with a lot of love, that it took years for her mother to understand what it is she does, as far as she was concerned, her daughter stirred at a computer screen, like somebody who needs help.

 

The most amazing thing about our digital age is that the person next to you in a Starbucks might just be hacking into a Swiss bank or launching multiwarhead nuclear missiles continents away. Or maybe he’s just on Facebook. You can’t tell the difference unless you’re nosy enough to peek over his shoulder. Hidden behind our ordinary appearance were unusual facts. Although we were in the same team, our sitting together was a rare occurrence. Most of the time worked online. This meeting in Barcelona is the first we have all worked in the same room, but on a daily basis we are working in different countries and continents.

 

The very idea of working remotely seems strange to most people until they consider how much time at traditional workplace is spent working purely through computers. If 50 percent of your interaction with coworkers is online, perhaps through e-mail and web browsers, you’re not far from what Joomla.org does. The difference is that work at Joomla.org is done primarily, often entirely, online, and probably most important by a team of volunteers. Some people, most people, work together for months without even being on the same continent. Teams can organize to meet during world events, to recharge the intangibles that technology can’t capture, like sharing hii-fives with a bottle of beer. Which explains our trip in Barcelona.

 

Here is what you don’t expect to do on your first meeting, Budget and Budget cut, for the event team. Most people doubt that online meetings work, but they somehow overlook that most in-person meetings don’t work either. Being online does mean everyone might be distracted, but plenty of meeting today are filled with people with their laptops open, messaging each other about how bored they are.  My theory is if what is being discussed is important, people will pay attention and in our meeting, Budget seemed to be the only topic of discussion and after that, we talked about other things, other personal things.

 

Later that day we all took seats at the bar, enjoying the conversation and some drinks. Many people know my name, but its only today that they can put a face on the name. When we are working on Glip or on email, you don’t see people’s faces. During our meetings on Hangout, most people don’t show their faces too. It’s difficult to know how they have changed or what color of hat they are wearing. But this kind of meetings allow you to answer some of the most disturbing questions on how your team mates look.

 

When you tell your neighbor that you have a Job, then spent the rest of the day, week, months, or year indoors, it’s difficult for them to believe you. And that’s just how internet has changed the way we work. For the Joomla Event Team, office was Hotel Alimara, so was home. And when we are in our different continents, we still have our office open on Glip, our tasks remain the tickets we solve-a ticket is when somebody sends a request, like a problem. Our boardroom is Hangout and skype and we live and breathe GitHub. With the hundreds of volunteers involved in Joomla community, the designers, programmers, engineers, translators, the people who sit behind their computers and launch applications that impact millions of users in the world.

 

The biggest consumers of coffee, this for them is where their work is, their heart is and their commitment is. It’s important to say that for me, Joomla has been a home, a wonderful place to work, network, make friends, interact and create strong bond of friendship. And when I look at people in action, all under the leadership of Sarah Watz, the President of OSM the future has never been brighter.