Perfect Blue

I was searching for a long time for the perfect blue, played around with different pigments, lost my track a bit through the dead of my mother and finally felt that I need another colour in this painting. My perfect blue has got a dash of green, a green I created by adding some terre […]

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Gewissheit

Der plötzliche Tod meiner Mutter hat uns, ihre engsten Angehörigen, fragend zurückgelassen. Je mehr wir über sie reden und uns erinnern, um so mehr Facetten entdecken wir von ihr. Wir erkennen, dass wir alle verschiedene Dinge über sie wußten. So langsam ergibt sich für uns ein neues, ein gemeinsames Bild. Dabei stellen wir unsere alten […]

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Meine Mutter

Als sie geboren wurde, war der zweite Weltkrieg schon vier Wochen alt. Ihren Eltern war sie eher eine Belastung und als die zweite ihrer drei Schwestern geboren war, wurde sie zu ihrer Oma gegeben. Dort wuchs sie auf und die Umstände ihrer Kindheit haben sie ein Leben lang nicht losgelassen. Als die Familie im Februar […]

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Traces

While tidying up my sentimental stuff a few weeks ago, I found some special editions from German newspapers to celebrate the German unification on October 3, 1990. This event was crucial for my life, but that’s another story. When reading through these newspapers again, my ideas about creating paper collages took shape. It’s been a […]

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How can I sell my art?

Painting itself is fun, interesting and sometimes a challenge, and I am happy when people tell me that they like my paintings, but my goal is to sell them.
I do not have to live on it, but of course I want to sell my art. This is a form of recognition that motivates and encourages.
So how can I make my paintings better known and show them to a broader public?

The first step was this website, bundled with the corresponding social media activities via Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.
I had the opportunity to show my paintings at exhibitions in Hamburg and Fitou, where I also sold some of them. Exhibitions are an excellent opportunity to get in touch with art enthusiasts, to receive feedback and suggestions and to sell.
The commercial art market is a special thing, it is quite difficult to find a gallery as an unknown artist, where you can exhibit.
There are, of course, some interesting approaches for how to show my work. I’ve looked around a bit, how other artists do it.

Art Platforms on the Internet

It is relatively easy to present one’s work and, at first glance, this possibility seems very tempting. The disadvantage is, there the artist is the product and the art is rather secondary. The more artists show their work on a platform, the more interesting is this website for investors, advertising and target group-specific offers but also for art lovers. Some platforms offer advice and curation, some are free and raise acceptable sales provisions.
The larger platforms are financed through sales promotions and complementary services for artists and art lovers, the smaller via monthly subscription fees.
It is not a big effort to put a portfolio on some of these websites and show one’s art to a broader public, e.g. https://www.saatchiart.com/christinegraf

Galleries

Difficult to get in, most do not take any new artists under contract or have already planned their exhibitions for the next two years.
A gallery does not want to take any risk and show unknown artists. The market is flooded by artists who already have a name and are still hard to sell.
With a little bit of luck you will be able to show a few pieces of your work for a short period of time, especially if the gallery is in a tourist region.

Self-Organised Exhibitions

This approach can work quite well, if several artists come together and cover a broad portfolio. We tried this last summer with the ARTFabrik and despite of this spontaneous idea without major planning, we were quite successful.
We will refine this concept and continue to pursue it next year.

Pop up Exhibitions

These are short-term exhibitions in shops, banks, offices or public buildings. Some business owners are very open to this idea, as it also helps them to present their own products catching the eye of their clients in an attractive way. It takes a little planning, of course, and you have to look at how that fits the concept of the business.

Art Events

Particularly in tourist regions, numerous events are organised, where local artists have the chance to present themselves. These can be by regular (art) markets or even one-time, yearly recurring exhibitions.
Here, too, one must be well-networked to have the chance to exhibit at all.

So I will go on the search, where I can exhibit next year, be it in the region where I live, in the German-speaking area, UK or elsewhere in Europe. Any suggestions and invitations are very welcome 😉 Contact me!

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Who inspired me: Mark Rothko

Until a few years ago, I could not imagine that I can create art.
It changed when I took a course in 2009, to learn using traditional techniques to restore and decorate walls.
My trainer was an artist-artisan, he not only miraculously mixed colours and materials, and explained how the different materials react with each other, he also conjured beautiful examples of multi-coloured stucco, lime plaster and Tadelakt.
I was thrilled, but still far away from thinking that this might have something to do with art.
For me, it was perfect craftsmanship, but it bordered on art 😉
During this course, I discovered that I have a knack for colours and I am quite good in applying the various techniques. So I started practicing to refine my skills. Over the years I have plastered many hundreds of square meters of walls. And still I did not think that this is a kind of art.
Friends who come to visit us every year began early to tell me that I should go a bit further and also use other supports than just walls because it is art, what I was doing.
I am indeed happy they liked the results of my work, but for me, the thought of trying that on canvas, was far away.
In January this year, we visited the Pop Art exhibition at the Tate Modern in London, and because this is such a wonderful museum, we went there again the next day and had a look at the permanent exhibition. I wanted to see the paintings of Gerhard Richter, who impressed me quite a bit a few years ago at the Museum of Fine Art in Leipzig, but this is another story to tell.
The Richter paintings are wonderful, but the biggest surprise for me that day was a room in which the Seegram Murals by Mark Rothko hang.

Mark Rothko Red on Maroon
Mark Rothko Red on Maroon

I had never heard of this artist and was deeply fascinated. What was hanging there, were paintings for decorating the walls of the Four Seasons restaurants in New York. These paintings reminded me very much of how I decorate walls. I spent about one hour in this dark room, I went back and forth, repeatedly looked at all pictures and was deeply touched. This subtle effect of how colours can influence a room (and moods) was overwhelming.
Now I understood what our friends thought when they looked at my walls and rooms. I decided to transfer techniques for the design of walls on canvas and adapt them to this flexible material.
At a first glance, it might look easy to paint with only one color, but it is quite complicated to bring in texture and depth and trigger emotions.

My two paintings Red and Blue are my first examples of just applying different hues of one colour.
Currently I’m experimenting with the color white, but it still takes a little until I like to show the result to the public.

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Who inspired me: Mark Rothko

Until a few years ago, I could not imagine that I can create art.
It changed when I took a course in 2009, to learn using traditional techniques to restore and decorate walls.
My trainer was an artist-artisan, he not only miraculously mixed colours and materials, and explained how the different materials react with each other, he also conjured beautiful examples of multi-coloured stucco, lime plaster and Tadelakt.
I was thrilled, but still far away from thinking that this might have something to do with art.
For me, it was perfect craftsmanship, but it bordered on art 😉
During this course, I discovered that I have a knack for colours and I am quite good in applying the various techniques. So I started practicing to refine my skills. Over the years I have plastered many hundreds of square meters of walls. And still I did not think that this is a kind of art.
Friends who come to visit us every year began early to tell me that I should go a bit further and also use other supports than just walls because it is art, what I was doing.
I am indeed happy they liked the results of my work, but for me, the thought of trying that on canvas, was far away.
In January this year, we visited the Pop Art exhibition at the Tate Modern in London, and because this is such a wonderful museum, we went there again the next day and had a look at the permanent exhibition. I wanted to see the paintings of Gerhard Richter, who impressed me quite a bit a few years ago at the Museum of Fine Art in Leipzig, but this is another story to tell.
The Richter paintings are wonderful, but the biggest surprise for me that day was a room in which the Seegram Murals by Mark Rothko hang.

Mark Rothko Red on Maroon
Mark Rothko Red on Maroon

I had never heard of this artist and was deeply fascinated. What was hanging there, were paintings for decorating the walls of the Four Seasons restaurants in New York. These paintings reminded me very much of how I decorate walls. I spent about one hour in this dark room, I went back and forth, repeatedly looked at all pictures and was deeply touched. This subtle effect of how colours can influence a room (and moods) was overwhelming.
Now I understood what our friends thought when they looked at my walls and rooms. I decided to transfer techniques for the design of walls on canvas and adapt them to this flexible material.
At a first glance, it might look easy to paint with only one color, but it is quite complicated to bring in texture and depth and trigger emotions.

My two paintings Red and Blue are my first examples of just applying different hues of one colour.
Currently I’m experimenting with the color white, but it still takes a little until I like to show the result to the public.

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Should the room fit to the art or the art fit to the room?

As an artist, I prefer that everyone buy the art they love, and thus they will find a place for it in their home. Selecting and placing art is an art in itself.
It might be difficult to find the right place in your home, fitting to your style. In such a case it could be helpful to hang it in different places, maybe re-arrange some furniture, re-paint a wall, improve lightning, all these changes will be worth in order to enjoy the art you love.
Abstract art could also be helpful to create a colour palette for your room by repeating one or two main colours of the painting in your home accessories. The same applies for lines and forms in abstract paintings.

Gold

I hung my painting Gold in different rooms, with different coloured walls. Just have a look and decide yourself the setting you would prefer.

In a bathroom

bath01

bathroom above bathtub

In a kitchen

kitchen02

In a living room

sejour02

Many people believe abstract art is just suitable for modern homes, but it can also complement nicely a more traditional setting. It can really refresh your home and modernize it a bit. Abstract art bridges between traditional and modern styles as you can easily pair up antique furniture with modern design pieces.

So if you do it the other way round, doing your home/room first, you might chose art which just complements your decoration. Quite often, the colors in an abstract painting can partially be found in the rest of the room by reuniting all the the colors around.  Sometimes, an abstract painting is the focal point in a room. However, rooms overcrowded with textures, materials and colours make you feel overwhelmed and take the focus away from your art.

The pictures above were taken in an old village house which is sparsely furnished with antique and modern pieces. Modern art fits very well into it 😉

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